How Do Teachers Choose Textbooks: A Guide for UTC Students

By Rose Street

Chattanooga, TENN. (UTC/The Loop) – The issue of textbooks is a controversial one, and money is always at the forefront of the conversation. But, a question that is rarely asked is, “How do teachers choose their class’s textbooks anyway?” This will hopefully be a little insight into how.

Chemistry Teacher with Students in Class

So, the first question we need to ask is, “How do teachers get access to multiple books at a time?” According to one Brigham Young University professor, there exist textbook publishers who send several texts to teachers, and they read through all of them to determine which would be best for you, the student.

UTC professor, Michael Andrews of the Communication Department, says that he relies on “intellect and gut” when choosing textbooks for his classes. He continues on to say that there are many questions that he considers when choosing a textbook, like “Does the book communicate out the material well?” and “Does it offer enough material, like exercises and suggested tests, that I can draw off of that there is a variety?”

Based on the questions above, I have provided a bulleted list from the Brigham Young University question and answer blog “Dear Professor, Dear Student.” Below are eight questions from that blog that a professor might ask when choosing a textbook:

  1. Does the book’s content match well with the learning objectives for the course?
  2. Is the book’s presentation style consistent with how I think students would most consistently learn?
  3. Do the problems in each chapter provide good learning experiences for the students?
  4. Do students like the presentation in the textbook (layout, figures, etc.)? Is the book engaging?
  5. Is the textbook reasonably free from typographical and other errors?
  6. Is the cost reasonable?
  7. Do other professors like the textbook as well?
  8. Does the publisher use a reasonable time frame between new editions?

If this list doesn’t help, there are many checklists online that could, like the one here.

Now, teachers do rely on different criteria based on the specificity of their classes, like a foreign language class or a math class. But, there are certain criteria that many professors agree upon.stack460The article “Planning a Course: Choosing and Using Instructional Materials” discusses several advantages and disadvantages to using a textbook. The most obvious advantage is that textbooks, when used properly, can aid in learning, and just like Professor Andrews said before, they can provide materials to help the teacher teach the students.

The video below shows a professor validating the use of textbooks.

But, there are some disadvantages. The first is that books are not interactive, and the second is that textbooks are usually thick, which can overwhelm students. Another disadvantage is that textbooks rely on dated information, and do not adapt as rapidly as modern technology, like computers.

After teachers choose the textbooks and put in their orders, that is where their involvement ends. Now, it is up to each student to choose whether or not they want to buy the textbook. I know from personal experience that sometimes I cannot afford to buy textbooks from the UTC bookstore, and I am sure that many other students have this problem.

There are a few articles that may help students in deciding whether or not to use textbooks or to be financially able to buy the textbooks that you need. Check out “Students Pay for Textbooks They Don’t Use,”The Budget Savvy UTC Student,” and “Affordable College Textbook Act Seeks to Ease Students’ Financial Burden.”

What do you think? Should professors require textbooks for their classes? Give your thoughts here.

I hope this was helpful in giving some insight into what teachers go through when choosing textbooks for their students. If you want to check out more articles concerning the issue of textbooks, check out the Communication Department blog, The Loop.

 

 

 

 

UConn, Notre Dame in Women’s NCAA Basketball Final

By Rose Street

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP/The Loop) — Women’s basketball came away a winner Sunday night. After a season-long buildup, the NCAA tournament will be decided by the perfect championship game.

The undefeated titans of the sport this season will meet Tuesday night in an historic championship game when UConn plays Notre Dame. It will mark the first time in NCAA basketball history that unbeaten teams will play for a title when the former Big East rivals face each other.

“It is pretty amazing,” Irish coach Muffet McGraw told The Associated Press after her team beat Maryland 87-61. “So many of the media and fans have been looking at this all season long. It’s great that we’ve made it this far.

“Both of us remaining undefeated. See who the best team is.”

Who’s Gonna Win?

Said UConn guard From Moriah Jefferson: “Now we can finally talk about it. That has been the talk of this whole tournament and I guess it is finally here.”

The teams didn’t play during the regular season this year for the first time since 1995 as Notre Dame moved to the ACC. That helped set up the championship showdown that will put the sport in the spotlight.

“It looked to me like as the season went on it almost looked like it was inevitable to happen,” UConn coach Geno Auriemma said. “It was supposed to happen. Our sport doesn’t have enough significant moments. … To have the spotlight on Tuesday on two teams that one is going to lose for the first time this year, it’s pretty remarkable when you think how hard it’s to do for one team much less two.”

Notre Dame (37-0) is one of the rare teams that has had success against the Huskies in recent history, winning seven of the past nine meetings, including beating UConn twice in the national semifinals. McGraw drew attention to that fact during the tournament selection show.

The Huskies (39-0) won the last one though, topping Notre Dame in the Final Four last season en route to the school’s eighth national championship. A UConn victory Tuesday night will be a record ninth for Auriemma, breaking a tie with Pat Summitt for most all-time in the women’s game. It will also cap the fifth perfect season for the Huskies and make them only the second team ever to go 40-0, joining Baylor which did it two seasons ago.

Auriemma has never lost a championship game.

Notre Dame will be trying for its second national championship. The Irish have had chances lately to winwin their first title since 2001, advancing to the national semifinals in four straight seasons. They lost in the championship game twice during that span.

They advanced to Tuesday night’s game with a convincing 87-61 victory over Maryland behind 28 points from senior All-American Kayla McBride.

Notre Dame played without senior Natalie Achonwa, who suffered a torn ACL in the regional final victory over Baylor.

Even without their star forward, the Irish dominated the Terrapins on the boards, outrebounding them in record fashion. Notre Dame had a 50-21 rebounding advantage, including a 19-4 mark on the offensive end. It was the widest rebounding margin ever in a Final Four game, shattering the previous mark of 19 set by Louisiana Tech in 1989. Maryland broke the national semifinals record for fewest rebounds in a game of 25 set by Minnesota in 2004.

They’ll need a similar effort against UConn and its imposing front line of Breanna Stewart and Stefanie Dolson.

The Huskies got off to a sluggish start against Stanford before taking control in the second half in a 75-56 victory. They probably can’t afford the same thing to happen for a fourth straight game if they hope to winwin that record title.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

9/11 Museum Coming in May

By Rose Street, Jake Chapman, Arielle Henson

NEW YORK (AP/UTC The Loop) — A long-awaited museum dedicated to the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks will open to the public at the World Trade Center site on May 21, officials announced Monday.
 

The opening will follow a May 15 ceremony and a six-day dedication period during which the museum will be open around the clock for 9/11 family members, rescue and recovery workers and others directly affected by the 2001 attacks, said Joe Daniels, president of the National 9/11 Memorial and Museum.

“We want to make sure that our doors are open for them to see it before the public does,” Daniels said.

The museum includes two core exhibitions at the foundation of the trade center complex.

One of them, called “In Memoriam,” pays tribute to the 2,983 people killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks as well as the six people killed in a truck bombing at the trade center on February 26, 1993. The other, a three-part historical exhibition, tells the story of Sept. 11 and explores what led to the terrorist strikes.

The museum’s regular hours will be 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.

“This is a major milestone,” Daniels said. “It’s just a very real marker of the rebirth of the World Trade Center.”

Planners had originally hoped that the museum could open in 2011, on the 10th anniversary of the attacks. Construction delays were made worse by flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy and by a funding dispute with the site’s owner, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, stopping all work for nearly a year.

The planned ticket price of $24 has angered some Sept. 11 family members.

Retired Deputy Fire Chief Jim Riches and Sally Regenhard, each of whom lost firefighter sons in the attacks, complained earlier this year that the museum “was never intended to be a revenue-generating tourist attraction with a prohibitive budget and entrance fee.” Museum officials defend the planned ticket price, saying the museum’s operations are privately funded.

Daniels said there will be no admission charge for relatives of Sept. 11 victims or for rescue and recovery workers. Children age 6 and younger will get in free, and admission will be free for everyone on Tuesdays from 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.

There will continue to be no charge to enter the World Trade Center memorial plaza, which is already open. About 5.3 million people visited the plaza last year to see the two huge fountains that sit in the original footprints of the twin towers.

 

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Tennessee Basketball Is Hit and Miss in NCAA Tournament

By Rose Street

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP/UTC The Loop) — The ACC’s national championship hopes now come down to one school: Virginia.

Meanwhile, Tennessee — one of the three SEC schools still in the field — came to Tobacco Road and turned it into Raleigh Top.

The Cavaliers and Volunteers cruised into the NCAA tournament’s round of 16 with lopsided victories Sunday night: Tennessee routed Mercer 83-63 before Virginia beat Memphis 78-60.

No. 11 seed Tennessee (24-12) will play second-seeded Michigan in a Midwest Regional semifinal Friday night in Indianapolis.

Virginia (30-6), the top seed in the East Region, will face fourth-seeded Michigan State in a semifinal that night in New York.

The Volunteers and Cavaliers restored some semblance of order after an unpredictable first day in the heart of ACC country.

It began Friday when Mercer beat Duke for the signature upset of the tournament, included Tennessee’s 19-point victory over Massachusetts and continued through Memphis’ tight win over George Washington.

The Vols had an easy time beating those Bears on Sunday and ended Mercer’s pursuit of a second straight Sweet 16 appearance for a tournament darling from the low-major Atlantic Sun Conference.

With “Rocky Top” echoing throughout PNC Arena all night, Tennessee outrebounded the Bears 41-19 — 24-4 in the first half — led by Jarnell Stokes, who broke the school’s NCAA tournament rebounding record he set two days earlier against Massachusetts.

Stokes had 17 points and a career-high-tying 18 rebounds against Mercer, after grabbing 14 boards against UMass.

“Any time we have Jeronne (Maymon) and Jarnell wearing Tennessee orange,” teammate Jordan McRae said, “we always feel like we have the advantage.”

Tennessee’s win helped the football-first SEC improve to 7-0 in this tournament. The Vols joined No. 1 overall seed Florida and Kentucky in the regional semifinals.

“I’ve been hearing that the SEC has been a football conference for a long time, but I don’t know how you can still say that when you’ve got three SEC schools in the Sweet 16,” McRae said.

Mercer was trying to match last year’s Florida Gulf Coast team in parlaying an Atlantic Sun title into a spot in the NCAA tournament’s second weekend, and become the first No. 14 seed to make the round of 16 since Chattanooga in 1997.

But the senior-laden Bears (27-9) trailed by double figures for the entire second half and couldn’t conjure another fantastic finish.

“I think hopefully by the time (reality) sets in, we’ll all be able to put a smile on and realize that what we’ve been able to do at our school, and for the city, has been phenomenal,” forward Jakob Gollon said. “It’s kind of hard to see right now.”

Mercer’s win over Duke was the most surprising in a series of losses this weekend for the ACC, which has only one team left standing — and it’s not traditional power North Carolina or heavyweight newcomer Syracuse.

“Lot of pride” in that, guard Malcolm Brogdon said.

The league champion Cavaliers were in control throughout against Memphis, leading by 15 at halftime and going up by 27 late while earning their first regional semifinal appearance since 1995.

Joe Harris scored 16 points and Anthony Gill added 13 for the Cavaliers, who hold a No. 1 seed for the first time since Ralph Sampson wore orange and blue.

Austin Nichols scored 15 points for the Tigers (23-10), whose season ended on the opening weekend of the tournament for the fourth straight year.

“Virginia came out, played Virginia basketball, out-toughed us, out-aggressived us,” Memphis guard Goren Johnson said. “They made shots. Every time we made a mistake, they capitalized on it with a bucket. There’s no excuses.”

 

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Chattanooga Public Works Official Approved For Involvement in Eco-Friendly Competition

By Rose Street

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (UTC/The Loop) – Chattanooga City Council approved the partnership between the Administrator of the Chattanooga Department of Public Works and the non-profit organization Green Spaces in the development of the Low Impact Design/Green Infrastructure Design Competition.

Lee Norris, the Administrator for the Department of Public Works, has been approved by City Council to work with Green Spaces to create the (LID)/Green Infrastructure Design Competition. The approval Tuesday, February 25 was unanimous.

Chattanooga City Council Chambers

Chattanooga City Council Chambers

Green Spaces is an environmentally conscious, non-profit organization whose mission it is to “work towards regional sustainability by progressing the way we live, work, and build.” The organization is based solely in Chattanooga, Tenn.

The (LID)/Green Infrastructure Design Competition will consist of two team members, a professional engineer and a registered landscape architect, and take place in Chattanooga.

Chattanooga.gov describes the competition as demonstrating “efficient, sustainable, cost-effective approaches to stormwater management and beautification of city infrastructure.”

Director Lee Norris relayed his hope for the competition to the Times Free Press saying, “The goal here is to get the architects, engineers and developers to get on the same page to see how green infrastructure can work on different areas.”

The time frame of the competition and the completion date has yet to be announced.

The Lyndhurst Foundation is providing a grant of $85,500 to develop the competition.

According to its website, The Lyndhurst Foundation “invests in initiatives, institutions, people and programs that contribute to the long term livability and resilience of the greater Chattanooga region.”

For more information about Chattanooga City Council, visit Chattanooga.gov for agendas and more.

Gamma Phi Beta UTC House Coming August 2014

By Rose Street

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (UTC The Loop) – Home, Sweet, Home! The Eta Kappa Chapter of Gamma Phi Beta has a house!

It was announced that Gamma Phi Beta, a recent addition to the Panhellenic sororities at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, had received a house.

Collegiate Leadership Counselor Maddy Schroeder could not share any news about current negotiations regarding the house or its location, but she is “very excited about the housing prospects in Chattanooga!”

Two Gamma Phi Beta Sisters

Two Gamma Phi Beta Sisters

UTC Sophomore Andrea Kulezs who joined Gamma Phi Beta in the fall of 2013 shared her hopes for the house, “I think it will make us closer as a sorority because we will be able to hang out with each othermore in a safer environment instead of going here and there and everywhere to meet.”

UTC Junior  and Gamma Phi Beta member Whitney Johnson said that the house is partially funded by the dues paid by the sororities members, and that it is on track to be open by August 2014.

The Eta Kappa Chapter of Gamma Phi Beta was founded in the fall of 2013 at UTC. For more information about Gamma Phi Beta’s arrival, visit the Times Free Press.

Other Panhellenic Council Chapters on UTC’s campus include:

  • Alpha Delta Pi
  • Chi Omega
  • Delta Zeta
  • Kappa Delta
  • Sigma Kappa

Further information about the house will be provided when it becomes available. If you are interested in joining the Gamma Phi Beta sorority or just learning more about it, go to UTC’s Gamma Phi Beta homepage.

Lung Disease Kills Marlboro Man

By Rose Street

LOS ANGELES (AP/The Loop) — Eric Lawson, who portrayed the rugged Marlboro man in cigarette ads during the late 1970s, has died. He was 72.

Lawson died Jan. 10 at his home in San Luis Obispo of respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, his wife, Susan Lawson said Sunday.

Lawson was an actor with bit parts on such TV shows as “Baretta” and “The Streets of San Francisco” when he was hired to appear in print Marlboro ads from 1978 to 1981. His other credits include “Charlie’s Angels,” ”Dynasty” and “Baywatch.” His wife said injuries sustained on the set of a Western film ended his career in 1997.

o-MARLBORO-MAN-ERIC-LAWSON-570

Eric Lawson appears in Marlboro ad

A smoker since age 14, Lawson later appeared in an anti-smoking commercial that parodied the Marlboro man and an “Entertainment Tonight” segment to discuss the negative effects of smoking. Susan said her husband was proud of the interview, even though he was smoking at the time and continued the habit until he was diagnosed with COPD.

“He knew the cigarettes had a hold on him,” she said. “He knew, yet he still couldn’t stop.

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A few actors and models who pitched Marlboro brand cigarettes have died of smoking-related diseases. They include David Millar, who died of emphysema in 1987, and David McLean, who died of lung cancer in 1995.

Lawson was also survived by six children, 18 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

 

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.