Final Exams at UTC

By: Victoria Hampstead

Victoria-Hampstead@mocs.utc.edu

Chattanooga, Tenn. (UTC/ The Loop) -For many, what happens in the next week or so will be a huge determinate for if their semester was considered successful or not. Yes, finals week has arrived on the campus of UTC.

Several students study at the Lupton Library

Throughout the semester time management, studying, and papers come and go but when finals begin there is a subtle shift in the air. For many, the tests, assignments, presentations, and papers due for finals carry much more weight than those due over the entire semester. For example, in one General Science class the research paper is worth over 25% of the final grade. With statistics like these, the notable influx to the Lupton Library is not without reason.

It’s true, the library is much more active during the last couple weeks of school. This is clear if you simply go to the desk and the answer is “we are out of computers”.  Does this indicate a change of study habits during finals?

Maggie Dougherty, a junior and communications major at UTC, said she notices the change in the library around finals saying she can’t focus because there are so many people.

Maggie Dougherty on the library during finals

Lauren Vantrese, a Junior Bio-Chemistry major, appreciates the Lupton Library during finals as a common meeting place for students.

Lauren Vantrese comments on the library

When it comes to studying in general, Jordan Foutch, 21-year-old Chemistry major says his study habits don’t change much when it’s time for finals. “My study habits are pretty much the same because they are so closely spaced together that you don’t have time to space them out.” Foutch also noted that while he retains information pretty well he feels that having to study in such a rushed manner causes him to put less effort into studying overall.  When asked what keeps Foutch motivated his answer was simple,

Brad Gibson, Chemical Engineering major, studying at the Lupton Library

“Getting accepted to Med School.”

Senior Kevin Brown, a mechanical engineering major, echoed Foutch in his frustrations about finals. Brown said by finals “I give up, I’m burnt out by the time they come around.” Although he is willing to admit “My study habits are sloppy, Helter Skelter if you will,” Brown said some motivators for him are will power in the form of friends and Red Bull.

Finals can be difficult for many but there are resources for help. William Rapaport, of New York at buffalo has several suggestions for handling exams. His article “How to Study: A Brief Guide” has helpful tips for studying in general but when it comes to exams he narrows it down.  He urges students to not simply re-read the text book, make a study outline, do sample problems, make flash cards, and finally stop studying when you are confident.

UTC takes note of the need and sometimes the time management issues students have for studying during finals and therefore the Lupton Library makes some changes for finals. Starting on Monday, April 25, Library hours extend to two in the morning on many weekdays and extend other hours throughout the week. This new schedule helps facilitate studying for many.

As exams approach, it may also be useful to note the exam schedule on UTC’s website.

Curfew for Chattanooga’s Coolidge Park

By: Victoria Hampstead

Victoria-Hampstead@mocs.utc.edu

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (UTC/TheLoop)-Chattanooga City Council met on March 29th to discuss curfew restrictions for youth in Coolidge Park, where other concerns quickly came into discussion.

In an ordinance proposed by Councilman Benson, restrictions would be placed on minors stating they could not be at Coolidge Park between the hours of 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. unless accompanied by an adult. The issue in question was if this ordinance should be passed or if it is narrowly tailored enough for the community versus being overly broad.

Coolidge Park on a sunny day

Councilman McGary did not agree with the legislation being passed and suggested that this legislation was in direct response to a shooting that took place on March 19th in the park. Councilmen Gilbert agreed pointing out that in addition to the legislation being, in his opinion, a very obvious result of the shooting, he would also not support it because there were so  many other areas having the same issues but nothing was being done there.

Click Here to hear Councilman Gilbert

In contrast, Mayor Ron Littlefield supported the legislation and said of needing improvements, that “ handling of young people who are picked up as a result of curfews and truancy issues” is needed.  Then he spoke of an alternative for minors, the South Recreation Center on 40th Street.

The ordinance was passed with only two of the nine votes being “no” and the recreation center will now be used as an alternative holding place for those who violate the curfew.

This Recreation Center, according to the Times Free Press, will provide a place for children ages 13-17 to be detained while they wait on their parents  to pick them up. According to Regional YMCA director Joe Smith ,“This is not designed to be punitive. What it’s designed to do is to uncover needs, and of course to protect that child and protect the other citizens in the park.” In addition, children 12 and under will be taken to Child Services and could be charged with neglect.

Some hope these restrictions will serve as an opportunity of prevention to further issues and believe the option of a recreation center to take kids to rather than charging them giving them more serious consequences will help regulate some of the curfew issues that have been present over the year.

To find more information on the South Chattanooga Recreation Center visit their website.

 

The Royal Couple, match made in the heavens

By Victoria Hampstead

Victoria-Hampstead@mocs.utc.edu

LONDON (AP) — Kate Middleton and Prince William are a match made in heaven. Just check their horoscopes.

The couple will be delighted to know their star signs, Capricorn and Cancer, indicate they are highly compatible and have a good chance of having a successful marriage, according to leading British astrologers.

“They probably feel like soulmates,” said Wendy Stacey, chair of the Astrological Association of Great Britain.

Take it as a bunch of hooey or a celestial peek into the future. Just keep in mind that The Associated Press reported in 1981 that an astrologer warned that Prince Charles, who was born under the complex sign of Scorpio, would have a “stormy marriage” in his union with Princess Diana, born under the sensitive, intuitive Cancer star sign.

Everyone knows how that ended up.

Jay Lucan, who works with the British Astrological and Psychic Society said the new royal couple have “75 percent relationship compatibility” based on their star charts — giving them “definitely a good chance” of outlasting William’s parents in matrimony.

Both Stacey and Lucan acknowledge they cannot confirm the accuracy of their predictions for many reasons. The biggest drawback is not knowing Middleton’s exact time of birth; Prince William’s was publicly announced as a matter of national interest.

So what do the couple’s birth dates tell us?

For starters, Middleton, born on Jan. 9, 1982, is a Capricorn (an earth sign) while William, born June 21, 1982, is a Cancer (a water sign). Each star sign is designated an element: air, water, fire and earth.

“Cancers and Capricorns are opposites as water and earth,” Stacey explains. “As a result, they can read each other very clearly and they have a deep emotional understanding. It’s quite a lovely thing.”

Middleton and Prince William, the astrologers claim, both exhibit characteristic traits of their star signs.

“William is emotionally very private — a typical Cancer. He doesn’t share a lot and likes to retreat,” Stacey said. Case in point: the couple plan to settle post-wedding in a backwater town in Wales as Prince William works as a search and rescue pilot with the Royal Air Force.

Think of the crusty crab that represents the Cancer sign, Lucan said — crabs have a thick shell on the outside, protecting a very vulnerable soft body. “William’s not that well-equipped to deal with criticism. He shares that same trait with his mother (also a Cancer),” Lucan said.

As a Capricorn, Middleton, apparently, is much tougher. “She definitely wears the pants in the relationship,” Stacey said.

Typical of her sign, Middleton is ambitious: she’s a commoner marrying into the world’s most famous royal family. And extremely patient — she did, after all, spend eight years waiting for her prince to pop the question.

(This version CORRECTS in last sentence that couple were together at least eight years.)

 

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.

 

Where Did All the Time Go?

By: Victoria Hampstead

Victoria-Hampstead@mocs.utc.edu

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (UTC/TheLoop)- The “Balancing Act” a student enters upon beginning college classes can take many different forms. For some students this is greatly impacted by their need to work while in school. Working can prove to have both positive and negative effects on the time management and success of students.

Working while in school for many students is a necessity. Take UTC sophomore Lindsey Leidhecker, 19, as an example. Leidhecker is an RA at Lockmiller Housing working 20 plus hours per week and also takes 16 hours of classes. When asked how she managed her time Leidhecher said, “I procrastinate because I’m worn out and I don’t want to work all night then do homework.” For Leidhecker, working is not an option but rather something she needs to do while in school. However, she said working while in school is a positive thing and will help her get a job when she graduates and also alleviate a financial burden.

Some students don’t work, but fill their time with other productive activities.

UTC senior Deborah Broomer, 21, does not work during the school year. Broomer is an English Writing major taking 18 hours per semester and said she doesn’t know how some people are able to work and go to school full time.

Broomer admits that she could manage her time a little better but said, “Not working gives me the change to volunteer at Inner City Children’s ministry.” This, Broomer said, should help her after she gets her graduate degree and begins looks for a job as a teacher

Sophomore Kellie Williams, 19, is like many other UTC student who don’t have to work during the school year. When asked how a job would effect her time management Williams said, “I think having a job would make me be more productive actually because I would be forced to do things at certain times.”

Some professionals feel that working in school is a beneficial thing to do.

2009 UTC Engineering Graduate, Jonathan Parrish, 26, worked throughout his time in school. Parrish, who is currently working as an Engineer with TVA, said, “working allowed me to gain beneficial work experience related to my major and also allowed me to pay for school.” Parrish worked a part time job his freshman and sophomore year while taking a full course load. When he was a junior and senior Parrish was involved with the Co-op program at UTC. When asked how important it was for him to have work experience he said, “It was very important and played a vital role in me landing an internship and my current job.” There were some negatives though; Parrish said his GPA was affected because he was so busy all the time.

Whether working, volunteering, or focusing solely on school, time management is a continuous struggle for many students.

For students who are interested in help with managing their time, The Center For Advisement and Student Success offers tips on time management and many other issues that may come up. For more information visit their website or stop by their office located in room 108 of the University Center.

ACM Award Nominations

By: Victoria Hampstead

Victoria-Hampstead@mocs.utc.edu

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Miranda Lambert proclaimed 2010 the best year of her life. After hauling in seven Academy of Country Music Awards nominations, 2011 isn’t looking so bad either.

Lambert, joined by Ronnie Dunn on Tuesday morning to announce the nominees at The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, received her first ACM entertainer of the year nomination and will defend her 2010 top female vocalist win, along with nods for song and single of the year. Kenny Chesney and Zac Brown Band were next with five nominations each.

Dunn summed up Lambert’s run with two words: “She’s smokin’.”

The blonde firebrand started her sizzling hot streak last year at the ACMs, with three wins, including album of the year for the lionized “Revolution.” After her engagement to Blake Shelton and the launch of her first headlining tours, she received a record nine nominations at the rival Country Music Association Awards and went on to win three.

Expect 2011 to be eventful as well. In 13 days she’s up for two Grammy Awards and her song “The House That Built Me” is also nominated. She’s due to marry Shelton later this spring. And she’s writing songs for her highly anticipated next album.

“ACMs are always a blast and they’ve always been great to me,” Lambert told The Associated Press after announcing the nominations on “The Early Show.” I’m still on Cloud 9 from last year, so I can’t really think about this. I can’t even believe that it’s here already and that I’ve got seven nominations. I didn’t even know I was eligible for seven.”

Jason Aldean, Toby Keith, Brad Paisley, Taylor Swift and Keith Urban join Lambert in the entertainer of the year category. In a surprise, two-time reigning entertainer of the year Carrie Underwood was not nominated after becoming the first woman to win multiple trophies in that category.

This is Aldean’s first entertainer of the year nomination at either of the major award shows. He’s used to being overlooked, so much so that while most of his peers woke up early Tuesday morning, he didn’t bother to set the alarm. He woke to calls from his manager, Clarence Spalding.

“My home phone rang, then my cell phone rang, and then my home phone rang again,” Aldean said in a phone interview. “I’m like, ‘Man, what’s going on?,’ and it was my manager. He said, ‘Hey, I just want to be the first one to congratulate you,’ and then he told me. I said, ‘Man, you got to be kidding.’ I actually didn’t believe it till I went online and read it myself. I thought he was trying to pull a very cruel joke on me. I said man, ‘It’s too early in the morning.'”

Entertainer of the year is one of two awards decided by fans along with top new artist. Fans can vote for this year’s entertainer winner into the third hour of the show, which will air live April 3 from the MGM Grand in Las Vegas on CBS.

Chesney made a strong return to the awards circuit after a year out of the spotlight. He earned four nominations as producer and artist on album of the year nominee “Hemingway’s Whiskey” and “The Boys of Fall,” a song of the year nominee. “Boys” also received a video of the year nomination.

The album of the year nomination is special to Chesney, who pulled his highly lucrative tour off the road last year to concentrate on “Hemingway’s Whiskey” and an accompanying football documentary around “The Boys of Fall” single.

“I was just so proud of this nomination because we really did try to take care of the music first with this album and to see it be recognized, it means everything, and kind of validates me taking time off the road,” Chesney said in a phone interview.

Zac Brown Band got higher value from its nominations than any other nominee. The band scored nods for top vocal group and album of the year for “You Get What You Give.” It also was nominated for single, song and vocal event of the year for “As She’s Walking Away,” earning featured singer Alan Jackson three nominations of his own.

And Brown scored four individual nominations as producer on the album, single and vocal event nominations and composer for song of the year.

“We’ve been pouring our heart and soul into our music, our albums and our live show for as long as we can remember, so it’s an honor to be recognized for all our hard work,” Brown said in an e-mail to the AP. “We have a lot to live up to in the coming year — and it’s a challenge we’re ready to take on!”

Swift and The Band Perry received four nominations each. Swift is up for top female vocalist with Lambert, Underwood, Reba McEntire and Lee Ann Womack.

Paisley, fresh off his artist of the year win at the CMA awards, is up for his fifth straight top male vocalist ACM. Aldean, Shelton, George Strait and Keith Urban also are nominated in the category.

Lady Antebellum, Little Big Town, Randy Rogers Band and The Band Perry join Zac Brown Band in the top vocal group category and Sugarland, the JaneDear girls, Joey + Rory, Montgomery Gentry and Steel Magnolia are up for top vocal duo.

Lady Antebellum’s “Need You Now,” Jamey Johnson’s “The Guitar Song,” Taylor Swift’s “Speak Now” and Dierks Bentley’s “Up on the Ridge” round out the album of the year category.

Lambert rode a groundswell of enthusiasm for “Revolution” and its fiery first single, “White Liar,” to her success in Vegas last year. This year it’s “The House That Built Me,” the poignant ballad about tough times that closely mirrored her own personal story growing up in Texas.

The two songs show Lambert’s versatility and Dunn, for one, thinks Lambert can expect a long career filled with nominations.

“She has that sass,” Dunn said. “It’s authentic. It’s not manipulated. That’s important. If you can come along and back that up with musical talent, you got it made.”

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.

Tennessee Democrat stands by Nazi remarks

By  Victoria Hampstead

Victoria-Hampstead@mocs.utc.edu

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Tennessee Democrat is defending his comparison of Republican health care arguments to Nazi propaganda.

Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis made the remarks earlier this week as House lawmaker debated repealing the new health care law. Cohen, who is Jewish, said Republicans are repeating lies and spreading false information, much like Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels did about Jews before the Holocaust.

He specifically criticized the GOP talking point that the health care bill was a government takeover, which he noted has been widely debunked.

“Just like Goebbels, you say it enough, you repeat the lie, you repeat the lie, you repeat the lie, and eventually people believe it,” Cohen said on the House floor. “The Germans said enough about the Jews and the people believed it and you had the Holocaust.”

In a statement released Thursday, Cohen said he never called Republicans Nazis and insisted he was referencing only their messaging tactics. He said critics and the media are taking his comments out of context.

“I regret that anyone in the Jewish community, my Republican colleagues or anyone else was offended by the portrayal of my comments,” he said. “My comments were not directed toward any group or people but at the false message and, specifically, the method by which it has been delivered.”

Cohen’s comments come as leaders of both parties have called on politicians to temper their rhetoric in the wake of the recent shooting in Arizona, which left six dead and injured Rep. Gabrielle Giffords

The newly formed bipartisan group No Labels, which is seeking to find common ground between Republicans and Democrats, was among the groups condemning the comparison, calling it a “toxic analogy.”

“Using an inflammatory Nazi analogy on the House floor to characterize the policy statements of your opponents does nothing to advance the health care debate and does plenty to widen the political divide,” the group said in a statement.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.