Bode Miller breaks down during NBC interview

Bode Miller was obviously emotional after winning the bronze in Sunday’s super-G, showing tears in his eyes in virtually every photo taken of him.
Bode Miller and his wife Morgan Beth after the race

Bode Miller and his wife Morgan Beth after the race

The surprise medal came after a long year in which Miller lost his younger brother. From CBS Sports:

The guy who for years and years insisted results don’t mean much to him declared he actually did care about this one. The last year has been a difficult one for Miller: the death of his younger brother, Chelone, in April 2013; the court fight over custody of his infant son; the work it took to come back from left knee surgery and return to the Alpine apex.

“It’s almost therapeutic for me to be in these situations, where I really had to test myself, so I was happy to have it be on the right side of the hundredths,” said Miller, who grew up in New Hampshire and is now based in California. “Some days … medals don’t matter, and today was one of the ones where it does.”

He wiped away tears in the finish area after someone mentioned Chelone, a charismatic snowboarder who was 29 and hoping to make the U.S. team in Sochi when he died of what was believed to be a seizure.

 

Fighting back tears, Miller joined NBC reporter Christin Cooper for a post-race interview and things went off the rails as Cooper asked multiple questions about Miller’s dead brother as the skier became more and more upset.

Watch the video: Bode Miller on TODAY

 

 

Deadspin published a transcript of the interview, which left Miller bent over the fence in tears.

Cooper: For a guy who said the medals don’t really matter, they aren’t “the thing,” you’ve amassed quite a collection. What does this one mean to you in terms of all the others?

Miller: This was a little different. With my brother passing away, I really wanted to come back here and race the way he sends it. So this was a little different.

Cooper: Bode, you’re showing so much emotion down here. What’s going through your mind?

Miller: A lot, obviously. Just a long struggle coming in here. Just a tough year.

Cooper: I know you wanted to be here with Chelly experiencing these games, how much does it mean to you to come up with a great performance for him? And was it for him?

Miller: I mean, I don’t know if it’s really for him. But I wanted to come here and…I don’t know, I guess make myself proud.

Cooper: When you’re looking up in the sky at the start, we see you there and it looks like you’re talking to somebody. What’s going on there?

Cooper is taking heat for her rough interview tactics.

Bode Miller is overcome with emotion after his bronze-medal run

Bode Miller is overcome with emotion after his bronze-medal run

 

Miller is taking the high road, asking via Twitter Monday morning for people to ease up on Cooper.

 

And he clearly wasn’t holding the interview against NBC, Miller made an appearance on “Today.”

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4 Women, 4 Strings

By: Charnele L. Box

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn (UTC The Loop)- The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga’s music department is known for having great musical events. This year the music department is will present the Marian Anderson String Quartet to the Chattanooga community, February 20 – 22.

In the fall of 1989, members of the Marian Anderson String Quartet, then known as the Chaminade Quartet joined forces to accomplish more than they ever dreamed. The Marian Anderson String Quartet has won major classical competitions and performed at the White House during a Presidential Inauguration.

image-masq-masks-small

(top to bottom- Prudence McDaniel, Diedra Lawrence
Marianne Henry, Nicole Cherry)

The Marian Anderson String Quartet Residency project was initiated by Dr. Jonathan B. McNair, Coordinator of Theory and Composition at UTC, as part of an effort to raise public awareness of the contributions to concert (classical) music by African American and other minority performing artists and composers.

“I became interested in bringing acclaimed African American classical music composers and performers to Chattanooga a few years ago. I had purchased a collection of music by Black composers, and liked some of the music very much,”  said McNair.

The four women are passionate about their musical art. They will perform a concert for the public, work with local music students, of high school and collegiate levels, conduct a workshop for young composers from around the Southeast, and participate in a public panel discussion.

The MASQ will visit Orchard Knob Elementary school on Thursday Feb. 20 in the morning, and Center for Creative Arts high school Thursday afternoon Feb 20.

“I hope to bring other highly skilled minority artist to campus in coming years, such as the Ritz Chamber Players, and/or the Imani Winds, or fine solo artists who I’ve come across online. If this MASQ program is successful, which I believe it will be, then we have a foundation to build on for the future,” he continued.

Each member of the ensemble is trained at top conservatories and universities such as Julliard School of Music, the Manhattan School of Music, and Shepherd School of Music.The women of the string quarter have a strong commitment to music education, and established a community music school in their home base of Bryan, Texas, as well as string quartet music camps in the Southwest and the Virgin Islands.

Sources: UTC Music Department and Marian Anderson Quartet Sites

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Come See UTC’s Play “No Exit” and Get A Taste Of Hell

By: Kelli Findlay

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn (UTC/The Loop) — UTC’s new play “No Exit” premieres February 11th-17th.

UTC’s play “No Exit” premieres Feb. 11th at 7:30. “No Exit” was written in 1944 by French philosopher and playwright Jean-Paul Sartre. Students can purchase tickets here.

Original No Exit Cover by Google Images

Original No Exit Cover by Google Images

“It is the story of three people trapped together for eternity. Hell is this room that they cannot escape and they’re trying to survive and figure out who they are based on people who are strangers to them,” explains Gaye Jeffers, associate professor of theatre and the director of the play.

“I don’t want to give too much away, but the design choices that we’re making are going to be surprising for some people,” says Jeffers. “The use of lights is going to be impactful and unexpected. In most theater productions, you only see the theater lights focus on the actors on the stage. We’re kind of using lights to focus on other parts of the theater as well. It will be kind of an event where the audience will be involved in a way that they might not normally be involved. There are some surprises I don’t want to give away what will be thematically important and will make the audience physically feel something instead of just thinking about things in their head.”

“NO EXIT” came out as a new installment movie in 2013 starring Leonardo Dicaprio and Michelle Williams. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hogoxHpcaNg

For more for information about the original play, you can check out the facts about “No Exit.”

UTC Speech Professor Jeannie Hacker-Cerulean said that she hopes that there is a great turnout for the play because she thinks that it is a great opportunity for students to get to know the theater department and see UTC’s talent.

Students are also excited about this psychological thriller of a play. UTC Houston, Texas Senior, Lindsey Carpenter, said “I can’t wait to go check this play out, I saw a movie that was similar with the ‘trapped in Hell’ theme and I think it will be scary!”

“NO EXIT” came out as a new installment movie in 2013 starring Leonardo Dicaprio and Michelle Williams.

 

 

 

 

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Flu Outbreak: General Overview, and How UTC Has Fared

By: Nick Porter 

CHATTANOOGA, TN (UTC/ The Loop) – Tennessee joins 11 other states who are experiencing a flu outbreak. Tennessee’s outbreak is considered in the most severe category listed by the Centers for Disease Control.

The Entire Country's Status of The Flu Outbreak

The Flu Outbreak Across the Nation

North Georgia has experienced similar issues including two flu related deaths on Monday according to the Times Free Press.

The epidemic has not affected UTC as much as the rest of the area, according to Timothy Jones, the director of Student Health Services at UTC. The university has had around 20 cases this outbreak, which is a relatively low number Jones says. He states that none of the cases have been too severe, and that compared to the rest of the area UTC has been blessed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RKv1Tj_jJ0

Kelli Findlay, a senior in the communication department,  told me what she does to stay healthy during the flu season. She said, “I don’t get a flu shot because my friend got it and had a much harder time with getting sick. I would rather just carry around hand sanitizer and take vitamins.”

For students who did not get the vaccine like Kelli, here are a few pointers from Dr. Jones.

  • First and foremost wash your hands often, and avoid touching your face.
  • If someone you know is affected by the flu try to avoid contact or being close to the person.
  • Also use paper towels instead of cloths to dry hands and clean surfaces.

 

If you feel like you may have the flu Dr. Jones says there are a few symptoms associated with the virus.

  • Dry hacking coughs and a sore throat are some immediate signs.
  • After that fever or chills can occur along with muscle or body aches.
  • Dr. Jones also says that the only way to truly know if you have the flu is to visit a healthcare provider.

Appointments can be made with Student Health Services by going to their website or by calling the clinic at 423-425-2266.

If any students are looking for more tips to lead a healthy lifestyle, the university offers campus wide health promotions including activities and presentations. For more information visit their UTC webpage.

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Graffiti: Contemporary Art for Urban Spaces

By Taylor Ellis

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn (UTC The Loop) – In 2010, while counting homeless people for the United States Census, Chattanooga native David Jones saw something that sparked an idea.

Jones, who lives just a few blocks from the gallery’s new location at 505 Cherokee Boulevard, said he ” saw a bunch of graffiti that people wouldn’t normally see, and I really liked it.” What has emerged from an idea in 2010 is Graffiti, a contemporary art gallery featuring modern works from many local artists.

The current space, which is much larger than the original location off the beaten path in North Chattanooga, offers street artists from Chattanooga and surrounding areas a place to sell their artwork. The regular gallery features both artwork and 3D installations from six resident artists, and the back of the gallery boasts a public graffiti wall for any artist to “tag.”

 

The Graffiti Wall is a public space where any artist can add his or her work

The Graffiti Wall is a public space where any artist can add his or her work

 

Happenstance, a UTC Senior art student collaborative

Happenstance, a UTC Senior art student collaborative 

Of the 50 or so pieces in the studio, a hand full are creations of UTC   students or graduates.  One of the gallery’s featured artists, Ellyn Bivin, is a Chattanooga native and graduated from UTC with a degree in painting and drawing. Along with Bivin’s pieces, the work Happenstance is a UTC Senior art student collaboration. The work is just one of many pieces currently in the gallery that have a direct connection to UTC.

 

The current artists feature in the gallery include:

- Bryan Rasmussen

- Ellyn Bivin

-Eddie Graham

- David Jones

- James McKissic

- Renel Plouffe

- Jim Tucker

- Derek Williams

- Larry Young

 

Many of the works that are featured at Graffiti are not there for long. All of the works on display are for sale. As David Jones playfully put it, Graffiti is all about sales. “We’d like to be the place that is you have a modern building, or a modern house,” Jones said, ” that if you came here you’d find a piece of artwork.”

When new pieces are added to the gallery, it’s not without celebration. In the upcoming month, new installations by artist Bryan Rasmussen, who previously worked with renown sculptor John Henry.

A work by artist Josiah Golson

A work by artist Josiah Golson

In addition to the new 3D pieces, many new paintings from Graffiti’s resident artists and special guest Josiah Golson, who is a young artist showing his work for the first time in a gallery setting.

Graffiti is located at 505 Cherokee Boulevard, and is open to the public. On the first Friday of the month, the gallery hosts new exhibit opening receptions from five to nine p.m. Graffiti is owned and operated by David Jones, and specializes in contemporary art for urban spaces.

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Phillip Seymour Hoffman: A Great Actor and Friend

PHILIP-SEYMOUR-HOFFMAN-02By Jake Chapman

 

NEW YORK (UTC/The Loop)(AP) — He was only 46, busy as ever and secure in his standing as one of the world’s greatest actors.

There were no dissenters about the gifts and achievements of Philip Seymour Hoffman, whose death Sunday in New York brought a stunning halt to his extraordinary and unpredictable career.

An Oscar winner and multiple nominee, Hoffman could take on any character with almost unnerving authority, whether the religious leader in command of his every word in “The Master,” a trembling mess in “Boogie Nights,” or the witty, theatrical Truman Capote in “Capote.”

Fearless in his choices, encyclopedic in his preparation, he was a Shakespearean performer in modern dress, bringing depth and variety to charlatans, slackers, curmudgeons and loners.

“Hearing that Philip Seymour Hoffman passed away came as much as a shock to me as to anyone else I’d imagine,” says Anton Corbijn, director of “A Most Wanted Man,” one of two films (the other being “In God’s Pocket”) starring Hoffman that premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival.

He was not only the most gifted actor I ever worked with,” Corbijn added, “…he had also become an incredibly inspiring and supportive friend.”

Friends, peers, family members and his countless fans were in grief after Hoffman was found in his Greenwich Village apartment with what law enforcement officials said was a syringe in his arm.

The two officials told The Associated Press that glassine envelopes containing what was believed to be heroin were also found with Hoffman. Those items are being tested.

  • 8 Glassine envelopes were found with Hoffman; 6 empty, 2 filled with what’s believed to be heroin.
  • 50 packets of heroin were found in Hoffman’s apartment.
  • 4 men have been arrested under the suspicion that they sold Hoffman the heroin.
  • Hoffman was found by screenwriter Andy Katz and his personal assistant Isabella Wing-Davey.

The law enforcement officials, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak about evidence found at the scene, said the cause of death was believed to be a drug overdose.

Police will only say the investigation is continuing. An autopsy is planned for Monday, according to medical examiner spokeswoman Julie Bolcer.

Besides his Oscar win for “Capote,” the stage-trained Hoffman received four Academy Awards nominations and several nominations for theater awards, including three Tonys. He was equally acclaimed and productive, often appearing in at least two to three films a year, while managing an active life in the theater. He had been thriving for more than 20 years and no one doubted that a long, compelling run awaited him.

Like Laurence Olivier or Meryl Streep, his appeal was not bound by age or appearance or personality. He was not an actor whom audiences turned to for youth and romance. Heavy set with a lumpy build and limp, receding blond hair, he was a character actor with the power to play the lead, in movies that screened in both art houses and multiplexes.

“No words for this. He was too great and we’re too shattered,” said Mike Nichols, who directed Hoffman in “Charlie Wilson’s War” and on stage in “Death of a Salesman.”

Hoffman spoke candidly over the years about past struggles with drug addiction. After 23 years sober, he admitted in interviews last year to falling off the wagon and developing a heroin problem that led to a stint in rehab.

The law enforcement officials said Hoffman’s body was discovered in a bathroom at his Greenwich Village apartment by a friend who made the 911 call and his assistant.

Late Sunday, crime-scene technicians carrying brown paper bags went in and out of Hoffman’s building as officers held back a growing crowd of onlookers.

Hoffman’s family called the news “tragic and sudden.”

“We are devastated by the loss of our beloved Phil and appreciate the outpouring of love and support we have received from everyone,” the family said in a statement.

With a range and discipline more common among British performers than Americans, Hoffman was convincing whether comic or dramatic, loathsome or sympathetic, powerless or diabolical.

In one of his earliest movie roles, he played a spoiled prep school student in “Scent of a Woman” in 1992. A breakthrough came for him as a gay member of a porno film crew in “Boogie Nights,” one of several movies directed by Paul Thomas Anderson that Hoffman would eventually appear in. He played comic, off-kilter characters in “Along Came Polly” and “The Big Lebowski.” He bantered unforgettably with Laura Linney as squabbling siblings in “The Savages.” He was grumpy and idealistic as rock critic Lester Bangs in “Almost Famous.” He was grumpy and cynical as baseball manager Art Howe in “Moneyball.”

In “The Master,” he was nominated for a 2013 Academy Award for best supporting actor for his role as the charismatic, controlling leader of a religious movement. The film, partly inspired by the life of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, reunited the actor with Anderson.

He also received a 2009 supporting nomination for “Doubt,” as a priest who comes under suspicion because of his relationship with a boy, and a best supporting actor nomination for “Charlie Wilson’s War,” as a CIA officer.

Many younger moviegoers know him as the scheming Plutarch Heavensbee in “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” and he was reprising that role in the two-part sequel, “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay,” for which his work was mostly completed. The films are scheduled for November 2014 and November 2015 releases.

Just weeks ago, Showtime announced Hoffman would star in “Happyish,” a new comedy series about a middle-aged man’s pursuit of happiness.

Born in 1967 in Fairport, N.Y., Hoffman was an athletic boy, but a neck injury sustained while wrestling ended any hopes for a career in sports. He soon became interested in acting, mesmerized at 12 by a local production of Arthur Miller’s “All My Sons.” He studied theater as a teenager with the New York State Summer School of the Arts and the Circle in the Square Theatre. He then majored in drama at New York University.

In his Oscar acceptance speech for “Capote,” he thanked his mother for raising him and his three siblings alone, and for taking him to his first play. Hoffman’s parents divorced when he was 9.

On Broadway, he took on some of the stage’s most ambitious parts — Willy Loman in “Death of a Salesman,” Jamie in “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” and both leads in “True West.” All three performances were Tony nominated.

Last year, Hoffman crossed to the other side of the footlights to direct Bob Glaudini’s “A Family for All Occasions” for the Labyrinth Theatre Company, where he formerly served as co-artistic director. Hoffman has also directed “Jesus Hopped the A Train” and “Our Lady of 121st Street” for the company and received Drama Desk Award nominations for both productions.

Hoffman is survived by his partner of 15 years, Mimi O’Donnell, and their three children.

___

Associated Press writers Tom Hays and Deepti Hajela, AP film writer Jake Coyle and AP Drama Writer Mark Kennedy in New York, and Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

 

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Not just NFL fans are Looking Forward to a “Super Bowl” This Sunday

super bowlSEATTLE (AP) — The way Bryan Weinman sees it, he and his friends already won their Super Bowl bet.

Two weeks ago, the nightclub DJ and a few buddies were sitting at a sports bar in Denver, joking about how funny it would be if the Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos — the NFL teams from the two states that have legalized marijuana — made it to the big game.

They decided to plunk down a $44 wager — the fee for registering the Internet domain www.stonerbowl.org — just before the Seahawks and Broncos won their conference championships.

It paid off. They’re now using the site to hawk T-shirts and hats celebrating the coincidence. One shirt features the Vince Lombardi Trophy, reserved for the game’s victors, refashioned into a bong. Another features a spoof of the league’s logo, with the letters “THC” — for marijuana’s active compound — replacing “NFL.”

From weed-themed Super Bowl parties to a Denver company’s “Stoner Bowl” tours of recreational pot shops, this year’s Super Bowl offers a twist on a sporting event better known for its beer commercials. Thanks to the recreational marijuana laws passed by voters in 2012, sales of taxed pot to adults over 21 began at Colorado pot shops Jan. 1 and are due to begin in Washington later this year.

There have been a slew of predictable, ready-made puns, most of which have to do with “bowl” being the part of the pipe where pot goes. Some fans have issued not-quite-serious calls for a cannabis-friendly musician — say, Willie Nelson or Snoop Dogg — to sing the national anthem.

“I’m staying home and will be watching the Super Bowl while I light up my own Super Bowl,” well-known stoner Tommy Chong, of the comedy duo Cheech and Chong, wrote on their Facebook page. The pair released a publicity photo doctored to show Chong in a Seahawks headband and Cheech Marin in a knit Broncos hat.

The Washington chapter of NORML, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, said it would be rooting on the “THC-Hawks.” It made a friendly bet with Colorado NORML for what they’re calling “Bud Bowl XLVIII.”

If Denver wins, the Washington chapter has to dress in Broncos colors and sing John Denver’s “Rocky Mountain High.” If Seattle wins, the Colorado chapter must dress in Seahawks colors and sing “Purple Haze,” by Seattle native Jimi Hendrix. Video evidence is to be posted on the winner’s Facebook page for at least a week.

In deference to the importance of good officiating, High Times magazine offered a guide to spotting “Stoner Bowl” party fouls, including the offense of “holding”: “When the violator takes, two, three, maybe eight hits before passing the joint.”

On Twitter, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals promoted its recipe for vegan “Colorado catnip” brownies, with caveats: “Note: This recipe is for humans only. Also note: This recipe is for legally obtained marijuana. PETA does not condone the purchase or sale of illegal drugs.”

At the sports bar, Weinman, 35, and his friends scribbled down their T-shirt ideas — first on coasters, and then paper. Their motto: “One team and a lot of fans are gonna get smoked.”

“There’s so many easy jokes,” he said. “I hope the average person finds comedy in what we’re doing.”

Even if the average person might, it’s not clear the NFL does. “We do not have any response,” league spokesman Greg Aiello wrote in an email.

Derek Franklin, the president of the Washington Association for Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention, said all the attention about the “Weed Bowl or the Bong Bowl, what have you, it drives home the wrong public health message.”

He noted that Washington NORML’s Facebook page featured a cartoonish version of the Seahawks logo, with bloodshot eyes and a joint in its beak.

“That’s the kind of thing that for kids, it’s going to stick in their heads,” he said. This Super Bowl is “incredible for the ‘Hawks, but tough for those of us in prevention.”

Medical marijuana advocates also suggested the joking over the big game underscores a serious issue: The NFL doesn’t allow its players, even those in states that have approved medical or recreational marijuana, to use it to ease the pain from the beatings they take on the field. Commissioner Roger Goodell said Thursday the league could reconsider that.

“I’m not a medical expert,” he said. “We will follow science. We will follow medicine. If they determine this is a proper method, we would consider it. Our medical experts are not saying that right now.”

Among those hoping to make a buck on the Denver-Seattle matchup is Matt Brown, co-founder of My 420 Tours in Denver. The company is offering a three-night “Stoner Bowl” package starting at $1,409. It includes tours of local marijuana shops and indoor gardens, lots of free samples, a cannabis cooking class and a private viewing party for the game.

Brown, who grew up in Kansas City and has mixed loyalties between the Chiefs and the Broncos, said he expected about 50 customers.

“We’ve been joking about the ‘Stoner Bowl’ for a couple weeks now,” he said.

___

Follow Johnson at https://twitter.com/GeneAPseattle

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Lung Disease Kills Marlboro Man

By Rose Street

LOS ANGELES (AP/The Loop) — Eric Lawson, who portrayed the rugged Marlboro man in cigarette ads during the late 1970s, has died. He was 72.

Lawson died Jan. 10 at his home in San Luis Obispo of respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, his wife, Susan Lawson said Sunday.

Lawson was an actor with bit parts on such TV shows as “Baretta” and “The Streets of San Francisco” when he was hired to appear in print Marlboro ads from 1978 to 1981. His other credits include “Charlie’s Angels,” ”Dynasty” and “Baywatch.” His wife said injuries sustained on the set of a Western film ended his career in 1997.

o-MARLBORO-MAN-ERIC-LAWSON-570

Eric Lawson appears in Marlboro ad

A smoker since age 14, Lawson later appeared in an anti-smoking commercial that parodied the Marlboro man and an “Entertainment Tonight” segment to discuss the negative effects of smoking. Susan said her husband was proud of the interview, even though he was smoking at the time and continued the habit until he was diagnosed with COPD.

“He knew the cigarettes had a hold on him,” she said. “He knew, yet he still couldn’t stop.

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A few actors and models who pitched Marlboro brand cigarettes have died of smoking-related diseases. They include David Millar, who died of emphysema in 1987, and David McLean, who died of lung cancer in 1995.

Lawson was also survived by six children, 18 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

 

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Singer Wins Gold at the End of the Rainbow

Album Cover

Album Cover

By: Charnele L. Box

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP/The Loop) — Tamela Mann has won seven awards including top honor artist of the year at the Stellar Gospel Music Awards.

Mann broke down in tears as she spoke with the audience during the 29th annual ceremony at Municipal Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn. She also won major awards female vocalist and CD of the year for “Best Days.”

Kirk Franklin’s “Take Me to the King” was named song of the year, Tye Tribbett took male vocalist of the year and Tasha Cobb won three awards including new artist of the year.

Hezekiah Walker and Anthony Brown & Group Therapy matched Cobb with three wins apiece as well.

The two-hour awards were hosted by Sherri Shepherd and Rickey Smiley and broadcast on the Up Network.

___

Online:

http://thestellarawards.com

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Leave the Biebs Alone, that’s somebody’s daughter.

 

By: Alex Givens
Miami, Florida (AP/Theloop) – MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Justin Bieber’s mug shot hints at the boy-next-door image he’s carefully crafted over the past several years, with a glistening smile and professionally upswept hair.
But the red jail jumpsuit also visible in the photo tells a different story, one about the singer’s recent troubles and emergence as a bad boy. The 19-year-old pop star is facing possible jail time after his arrest in Florida on charges of driving under the influence, resisting arrest and driving with an expired license.

Still, as he has been so many times since achieving stardom at age 15, Bieber was swarmed by crowds of news media and screaming young girls as he left jail Thursday afternoon. He popped through a window of his black SUV in a black hoodie and sunglasses to wave back.

Police said they arrested a bleary-eyed Bieber — smelling of alcohol — after officers saw him drag-racing before dawn Thursday on a palm-lined residential street in Miami Beach, his yellow Lamborghini traveling at nearly twice the speed limit.

He was arrested early Thursday with R&B singer Khalil Amir Sharieff, after police saw them racing two luxury vehicles down the street at 4:09 a.m., with two other vehicles apparently being used to block off the area.

The 19-year-old singer later admitted smoking marijuana, drinking and taking a prescription medication, police said.

Police Chief Ray Martinez said the singer was initially not cooperative when the officer pulled him over. Martinez said the singer also had an expired Georgia driver’s license.

Police said Bieber was driving the Lamborghini and Sharieff was driving a Ferrari. Both cars were towed. Police say Bieber was clocked at nearly double the area’s 30-mph speed limit near a high school, youth center, golf course, city firehouse and small apartment buildings.

According to the arrest report, Bieber “had slow deliberate movements” and appeared to be in a stupor when the officer ordered him to exit his vehicle. Bieber was arrested after repeatedly refusing to put his hands on his vehicle so the officer could pat him down to look for weapons, the report said. It says he cursed several times at the officer and demanded to know why he was being arrested. At one point, Bieber said to an officer: “What the f— did I do, why did you stop me?”

The Biebs resisting arrest.

The Biebs resisting arrest.

Bieber failed a field sobriety test and was taken to the Miami Beach police station for a Breathalyzer, police said. Results haven’t been released.

“I think this case will proceed hopefully as any other case would proceed,” said Bieber’s attorney, Roy Black, whose other celebrity clients have included Rush Limbaugh and William Kennedy Smith.

Under Florida law, people under the age of 21 are considered to be driving under the influence if they have a blood-alcohol content of 0.02 percent or more — a level the 5-foot-9, 140-pound star could reach with one drink.

For a first DUI offense, there is no minimum jail sentence and a maximum of six months, a fine of $250 to $500, and 50 hours of community service. For anyone under 21, there is an automatic six-month license suspension.

A Miami-Dade County judge set Bieber’s bond at $2,500 Thursday afternoon. Sharieff’s bond was set at $1,000 for a DUI charge.

Bieber reportedly spent far more money at a Miami strip club Monday night, when the King of Diamonds club tweeted that Bieber ordered $75,000 in dollar bills. The club’s operator later acknowledged that was an exaggeration and that the singer only stayed about an hour.

Bieber and his large entourage were escorted to a closed-off section of the club. They enjoyed the dancers and ordered a large amount of bottled water, but no alcoholic beverages were sold to them, said Ricky “Disco Rick” Taylor in a statement.

“He had a lot of fun,” Taylor said. “We hope he returns again.”

The Canadian-born Bieber was only 15 when his platinum-selling debut “My World” was released. His brand was clean-cut and charming, earning him an invitation to sing for President Barack Obama and his family at Christmas. But his image tarnished as he got older.

Bieber has been accused of wrongdoing in California but has never been arrested or charged. He is currently under investigation in a felony vandalism case after a neighbor reported the pop star threw eggs at his house and caused thousands of dollars of damage.

A neighbor had previously accused Bieber of spitting in his face, and a paparazzo called deputies after he said Bieber kicked him, but prosecutors declined to file charges in either instance. He was also accused of reckless driving in his neighborhood, but in October prosecutors refused to seek charges because it was unclear whether Bieber was driving.

His arrest in Miami is unlikely to affect the egg-throwing investigation, which included nearly a dozen detectives searching Bieber’s home last week searching for video surveillance and other evidence that could be used to pursue a vandalism charge.

Bieber is also being sued by a former bodyguard who says the singer repeatedly berated him, hit him in the chest and owes him more than $420,000 in overtime and other wages. The case is scheduled to go to trial in Los Angeles next month.

Bieber’s arrival in Florida earlier this week also is under investigation. Authorities in the suburban Miami city of Opa-locka are investigating whether the singer was given a police escort when he landed Monday at the Opa-locka Executive Airport.

Police escorts from the airport are not uncommon, but they must follow procedure because they involve city vehicles, Assistant City Manager David Chiverton said. Administrators had not authorized any escort for Bieber in this case.

Despite all his legal troubles, the charges against Bieber likely won’t put him at risk of being deported or denied entry into the U.S. According to U.S. immigration law, authorities generally do not revoke an individual’s visa unless the person has been convicted of a violent crime or has been sentenced to more than one year imprisonment.

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Kay reported from Miami. Associated Press writers Suzette Laboy and Laura Wides-Munoz in Miami, Tony Winton in Miami Beach, Fla., and Anthony McCartney in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

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