The Chattanooga Concussion Prevention Initiative (CCPI) and The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and the Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Center (VSCC) will host a FREE seminar on sports concussion safety on Tuesday, August 13, 6:30-8 p.m. at the University Center Auditorium at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Coaches, school administrators, and parents will learn how to protect child-athletes from concussions.

Seating is limited and registration is required. Please visit: vanderbilthealth.com/concussionseminar to RSVP.

In response to Tennessee legislation which mandates concussion education must begin in January 2014, a group of experts from the CCPI and VSCC will provide information on comprehensive concussion for athletes of all ages.

“There’s a lot of misinformation out there among parents, coaches, and administrators,” said Scott Bruce, CCPI founder and UTC faculty member. “There is a need for these groups to learn how to recognize the injury and manage it appropriately. That means not sending a child back to the playing field too soon.”

Seminar experts will cover a range of topics including signs and symptoms, the importance of baseline testing, long-term effects, return-to-play guidelines, proper equipment fittings, and more.

Chattanooga speakers, who also helped establish CCPI:

• Dr. Danielle Mitchell, board-certified and fellowship-trained in Sports Medicine
• Dr. Jason Robertson, board-certified in both sports medicine and family medicine
• Dr. L. Shay Richardson, M.D., primary residency training in Emergency Medicine and sub-specialty in Sports Medicine and Interventional Pain Medicine
• Dr. J. Christopher Young, clinical neuropsychologist
• Scott L. Bruce, MS, ATC , Lecturer and Director of Recruitment for Graduate Athletic Training Education Program at UTC; founder Chattanooga Concussion Prevention Initiative
• Lisa Morgan, Chattanooga Area Brain Injury Association

VSCC’s speakers include:
• Dr. James Fiechtl, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
• Dr. Allen Sills, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Director of Neurosurgery Community Practice
• Dr. Gary Solomon, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery and Psychiatry
Village at Vanderbilt, Neurosurgery Clinic

This seminar is made possible by the generous support of Rawlings Sporting Goods Company.

About Chattanooga Concussion Prevention Initiative
The Chattanooga Concussion Prevention Initiative (CCPI) is a group of medical professionals and brain injury specialists dedicated to providing complete care for physically active individuals that participate in all types of activities and at all levels of competition. The CCPI was developed in 2012 to offer education and information about concussions, deliver comprehensive concussion care including the assessment, evaluation, treatment and management of concussions, provide support and advocacy for return to school, and to track and research concussion outcomes to offer greater safety and awareness to coaches, administrators and parents.

About Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Center
The Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Center (VSCC) is an international leader in concussion education which provides state-of-the-art comprehensive care for injured athletes of all ages and levels of play, from youth and recreational to professional and Olympic athletes. VSCC’s team of experts is trained in advanced management of concussion, and offers total management for the injured athlete. VSCC is the official provider of concussion services to the Nashville Predators, U.S. Olympic Equestrian teams, the Nashville Sounds, Vanderbilt University and Belmont University athletic teams, and numerous private and public schools and youth leagues in the Nashville area. For more information, visit www.VanderbiltSportsConcussionCenter.com

About University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Founded in 1886, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) is an engaged, metropolitan university committed to excellence in teaching, research, and service, and dedicated to meeting the diverse needs of Chattanooga and the surrounding region. For more information, visit www.utc.edu

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