Will Wade, UTC’s new Men’s Basketball Head Coach, explored the five values he considers necessary for living a prosperous life at Convocation 2013.

Speakers for Convocation 2013 included Provost Gerald Ainsworth, Will Wade, Chancellor Steve Angle, Dr. Verbie Prevost, George Connor Professor of American Literature

Speakers for Convocation 2013 included Provost Gerald Ainsworth, Will Wade, Chancellor Steve Angle, Dr. Verbie Prevost, George Connor Professor of American Literature

“I believe appreciation, enthusiasm, competitiveness, unselfishness, and accountability are the cornerstones for a meaningful college experience,” Wade said in his presentation. “More importantly, I believe these attributes are applicable and necessary for a prosperous journey regardless of the season of your life. These five values will help lead you towards success and satisfaction in every day of your future,” he said.

Prior to coming to UTC, Wade was considered one of the top up-and-coming assistant coaches in college basketball. During his four years at Virginia Commonwealth University, Wade was an integral part of implementing the Ram’s full-court press ‘Havoc’ defense. During his last two seasons at VCU, Wade’s defenses led the nation in steals.

Wade spent two seasons on the coaching staff at Harvard University. A 2005 graduate of Clemson University with a degree in Secondary Education, Wade spent six years with the Clemson basketball program from 2001-07.

In keeping with UTC’s recent tradition of connecting convocation to UTC’s First Year Reading Experience, Wade’s speech was based on the book This I Believe, which features a compilation of essays on the topic of personal belief and philosophy. The book is based on the popular National Public Radio segment.

Littleton H. Mason Singers provided a musical presentation

Littleton H. Mason Singers provided a musical presentation

Wade wrote his own essay about what he believes—five core values that can “lead anyone to success and contentment.”  Here are some of his thoughts about appreciation, enthusiasm, competitiveness, unselfishness, and accountability:

  • The majority of people, myself included, find it easy to appreciate an act of kindness bestowed upon us, but rarely recognize daily moments which are equally deserving of our gratitude. I have learned to appreciate both good and bad circumstances. The feel-good scenarios are easy, but we should be mindful that tough situations make us better people. Appreciate both.
  • During my coaching career, I have come across a number of student-athletes whose talents and abilities were comparable to one another. Without exception, the person who attacked his desires and tasks with great enthusiasm won out in the end.
  • The most prosperous teams I’ve ever been involved with had cultures which contained heavy doses of appreciation and enthusiasm, and without exception healthy competitiveness followed.
  • More than any of the other four core values, unselfishness is a choice…The unexpected result of an attitude of unselfishness is that when one puts it into action, he receives as much benefit and prosperity as the person receiving the help.
  • Individuals who have an appreciation for their circumstance, enthusiasm for their responsibilities, a spirit of competition, and an unselfish approach generally tend to run towards accountability rather than away from it.

The First Year Reading Experience fosters a sense of community among students, faculty, and staff by providing a common topic of discussion across disciplines and relationships. To provide more discussion opportunities, the University is offering a series of First Year Reading Experience-related activities throughout the year.

The First Year Reading Experience lecture is supported by the Raymond B. Witt Perspectives Endowment.

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