Blog Archives

Optimizing Email

NEWSFLASH! There’s no hard and fast rule that says you must respond to every ding, buzz, or chirp the second after you hear it. Reducing the amount of email you receive is about educating students to read the syllabus and to utilize the discussion boards. Managing your email can be achieved by using tools like filters, rules, and auto replies. A good first step is to train your students

Ideas for Faculty: Making the Most of your Summer!

By the time Spring semester ends, most faculty are ready for a short break. Whether you teach in Summer or not, just having a lighter load can make all the difference and allow you to time to recharge. One of the best ways to fight that burned out feeling, is to set aside a little time to learn something new. That way, when you go back to your classes,

IclickerGO replaced with REEF polling

If you are a user of audience response systems or “clickers” at UTC, there is a change coming this fall that you will want to know about.  Iclicker is moving from using its own IclickerGO application, that allows use of smart phones as clickers, to REEF polling which is a new mobile-first classroom engagement product.  Some faculty only allow the use of the handheld clicker device in class and

Faculty Highlights – Professor Christina Vogel

This month’s faculty highlight is Christina Vogel, Assistant Professor of Art, Painting and Drawing. Professor Vogel received a grant for the Spring 2014 semester to support an experiential learning project for her upper division Drawing VI class (ART4060). Drawing VI is the most advanced level class for drawing, and is a requirement for students who are in the BFA painting and drawing program. Juniors and Seniors in the BFA

Faculty Highlights – Dr. Jennifer Boyd

  Dr. Boyd is currently working in her 12th semester at UTC. She teaches ecology and climate change biology. We selected Dr. Boyd for this month’s faculty highlight because of the grant she was awarded in Fall of 2013. Dr. Boyd’s ecology class is coupled with a lab that traditionally required students to conduct experiments on the local flora and fauna. Unfortunately, the experiments were so local they were

Faculty Highlights – Dr. Amye Warren

In the time Dr. Amye Warren has been with UTC she’s developed some unique approaches to foster critical thinking in her classes. This August will mark her 30th year at the university. This faculty highlight article will outline a few of the innovative methods Dr. Warren has developed to get her students deeply involved in her course material. One theme that is pervasive throughout all of her classes is

Team-Based Learning

Over the past year and a half, we’ve hosted two campus workshops on team-based learning, also called TBL.  Bill Roberson of the University at Albany does a great job on getting your buy-in on the method, and many folks, including one entire department, have implemented it extensively at UTC.  TBL is much more than “group work”; it is a strategy on which you plan your entire course.  There are

Where do we start?

For the last month, I’ve been analyzing survey data collected as feedback to our student orientation on critical thinking. The qualitative answers vary greatly, but one theme emerges through a majority of the responses. These students are excited about active learning. They frequently say that they are looking forward to college because it’s so different from their high school classes. Every time I read comments like these I feel

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Faculty embrace experiential learning and critical reflection in a general education science course

Brad Reynolds and Tom Wilson received a Beyond the Classroom ThinkAchieve grant to fund an experiential learning activity in a general education non-laboratory science course.  During fall 2012, students in Bio/ESC 1100 (Conservation of Biodiversity) were given the option to participate in a hands-on field experience and reflection activity in lieu of taking the final exam in the course.  Instead of just listening to a professor talk about conservation,

The Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education

The Seven Principles By: Dawn M. Ford It was in 1987 when Chickering and Gamson wrote about the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education.  Years later, those principles still hold up, so it’s good to review them every now and again to keep us fresh. Principle one is that contact between students and faculty should be encouraged.  It’s important that students know that faculty care about them.