Blog Archives

The Power of an English Degree

As an undergraduate student in the English department, I’ve often found myself pondering the big questions concerning my future: What will I do when I graduate? What’s the job market like? Is graduate school a good option for me? I know I’m not alone in this mental exercise. Thankfully, the English Honor Society Sigma Tau Delta recently held a panel with four former English students to help current undergraduates

Launch Party for UTC English Grad Program’s New Southern-Inspired Magazine: CATALPA

Catalpa, a magazine of Southern perspectives, will release its first issue this April. This new publication thrives on the unique, unorthodox, and creative stories inspired by the South. Catalpa solicits submissions related to, or written in the South. At Catalpa we want to inspire, entertain, and evoke thought. Please support Catalpa’s release by attending our Catalpa Magazine Launch Party on April 28th at 6:00 p.m. in the Southern Writers Room

Moving Beyond the Academy: An English Major Makes the Transition to Professional Writer

*The following is a guest column by Senior English Major Laura Coker. For my senior capstone project, I earned an internship at the Children’s Advocacy Center of Hamilton County (CACHC). The CACHC offers services, such as counseling, medical support, and investigative services, to children who are victims of abuse. As their first English major intern, I was assigned the task of creating a manual for their internship and volunteer

Internship Ins & Outs: Part II

As we’ve already seen, faculty explained that internships give students an edge in the job market, and teach a wide range of skills that can’t be learned through coursework alone. Internships also look really impressive on a resume, demonstrating to employers that potential hires have the drive to apply themselves in a non-academic environment. It’s clear that our English faculty sees the value in pursuing an internship, but what

10 Reasons to be an English Major (or Minor)

1. The Liberal Arts (yes, including English!) are “tech’s hottest ticket”? It’s true.   2. 93% of business leaders said that “a demonstrated capacity to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems” was more important that a job candidate’s major.” It’s true.   3. Intercultural skills, such as accepting different cultural contexts and viewpoints, will be vital in the 21st century. It’s true.   4. 97% of executives rate strong

Internship Ins & Outs: Part I

Working as an intern before graduating college can pay dividends for one’s future. The success of an intern is tied to complex factors, but it’s an opportunity for students to get actual work experience under their belt and get a feel for the professional world beyond college. One of the toughest transitions all students face after graduation is finding jobs related to their majors without prior work experience in

An English Graduate Student Dialogue

Interviewer: Alex Plaumann, First-Year Rhetoric and Writing Interviewees:               Alex: Why English? What led to you to becoming English graduate students? Dominik: I started studying English in Austria in 1993 and the love of the language has always stuck with me. I had the opportunity to go to England when I was 16, and something about the language reverberated with me. So after my time

Student Takes on the English Major

Family and friends might think that being an English major leaves you with one option, teaching. But the reality is that your options are endless. Students can pick up on numerous skills that are viable for real world work environments. Employees are looking for communicators who can work productively with a team and coordinate effectively. They look for critical, innovative thinkers who can identify and solve problems. They want