US and UK Legal Treatises

The UTC Library now has access to “The Making of Modern Law: US and UK Legal Treatises,” a robust collection of legal primary resources dating from the 19th and early 20th centuries.

This database features 10 million pages and over 21,000 works that provide a comprehensive look at many different aspects of law. Historians and legal researchers will appreciate the ability to keyword search across the full text of all documents available as well as browse the database by treatise title and author. Researchers also have the ability to limit their searches by topics like criminal law, education, social security, and legal history for more targeted results. The advanced search feature will even pull illustrations and cartoons!

Take a look at what “The Making of Modern Law: US and UK Legal Treatises” has to offer!


Burney Collection of 17th & 18th Century Newspapers & Pamphlets

The newspapers, pamphlets, and books gathered by the Reverend Charles Burney (1757-1817) represent the largest and most comprehensive collection of early English news media. The present digital collection, that helps chart the development of the concept of ‘news’ and ‘newspapers’ and the “free press”, totals almost 1 million pages and contains approximately 1,270 titles. Many of the Burney newspapers are well known, but many pamphlets and broadsides also included have remained largely hidden. These treasures can now be searched, browsed and discovered again within Gale Digital Collections.

Highlights include:


news of Surrender of Lord Cornwallis

News – Surrender of Lord Cornwallis

Publication of the Works of William Shkespeare

Publication of the Works of William Shakespeare

news clipping slave trade and the somerset case

Slave trade and the Somerset Case

Access Burney Collection of 17th and 18th Century Newspapers and Pamphlets


Join a Summer Writing Group

The Writing & Communication Center is offering summer writing groups for undergraduate students working on summer research projects. Are you working on a thesis or other research project this summer but don’t know where to start? Would you like help staying accountable for your writing goals? This might be a great resource for you! The writing group will meet for an hour a week during the summer. Participants will set weekly writing goals, discuss their progress, and potentially share some of their work with the group.

Please contact the WCC at wcc@utc.edu if you are interested in participating in this opportunity. Please provide your name, your major, the topic of your research, and what you’d like to accomplish in a summer writing group. Click here to visit the Writing & Communication Center’s webpage.


Intern Perspectives: Kayle Freeman

This blog post was authored by Kayle Freeman, an intern in the Library’s Special Collections unit from the UTC Department of History in Spring 2018.

Being presented with the opportunity to intern with Special Collections at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga has provided me with valuable knowledge and hands on experience. Having the chance to experience, first hand, the job duties of an archivist has helped me put into perspective the trajectory I want my future career to go. Anyone can read a job description, but actually working in the field and being around professionals provided me a better perspective for the hard work and knowledge required for the job. It also provided me with a foundation to build on for future job prospects.

Before I began my internship, I was not aware of how difficult it could be to properly archive historical materials. Even during the first few months, I believed the job was not too complicated. That was because the collection had already been organized and mostly named before I began sorting through the materials. Eventually, I reached a point in the semester where the materials had been newly acquisitioned, and nothing was organized. I was given numerous photographs that were placed in the same archival preservers no matter the subject of the photographs, with no hints as to what was what. Previously, pictures depicting one specific topic were kept together, and I had a guide to follow telling me what was supposed to be in each preserver. I then realized there was much more involved in an archivists job duties and that it can be extremely difficult sometimes to accurately identify, describe and categorize historical objects. Having organizational skills and patience are key factors for this profession.

I was tasked with looking at photographs, figuring out what they depicted, labeling them accordingly and creating corresponding finding aids. Many of the photographs were not titled, so I had to use deduction skills to pin point the subjects of the photographs. I am also not from the Chattanooga area, where most of the photographs were taken, so many of the buildings and other sites were foreign to me. This prompted hours of internet searches that usually yielded answers. Since I was an intern, I was expected to solve issues on my own in order to develop my problem solving skills. In the future, when I enter my career, I will not have the assistance of faculty members to help walk me through my job expectations. When I did ask a question, their first response was if I looked it up first. Not only has this internship taught me how to work without much additional assistance, but has increased my confidence in the work I produce. I no longer second guess my decisions on how to fix problems.

This opportunity taught me, not only lifelong lessons regarding how to work in a professional setting, but also the history of Chattanooga. The collection I had the privilege to work with was Robert Boyer’s photographs. Before his thirteen year career as the Director of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga’s Performance Series, he was a successful architectural and advertising photographer. His love for photographing landscapes caught the attention of the River City Company who needed someone to help document the changes they planned on making in Chattanooga. Most of the developments, and therefore the work produced by Boyer, ranged from the 1980’s to the early 2000’s, where Boyer captured the transformation of Chattanooga.

Before Chattanooga became the beautiful, green and inviting city as it is known today, it was a polluted, smoggy and mostly industrial city, as seen below.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Robert Boyer even stated that as a kid, he had to bring two shirts to school and change at lunch because of how dirty the air was. One of Boyer’s goals while working with the River City Company was to capture images that would advertise Chattanooga’s progress and sell Chattanooga as a destination to outsiders. He also needed to help sell the idea to its residents that Chattanooga could improve and become a better place to live. Not only did he document the rejuvenation of Chattanooga but he documented the planning process behind it. Often times there would be community meetings where people could share their ideas about what they would like to see in their city. He photographed these meetings to show residents that they, too, were able to make an impact in their city, and that decisions were not made by only the top members of society.

Even though the factories were to blame for the high pollution rates in Chattanooga’s early years, they provided jobs for people. As factories began shutting down, and jobs became scarce, it was clear Chattanooga needed an economic revitalization and investors took advantage of the opportunity. Creating new businesses and ventures would provide more jobs and at the same time stimulate the economy. Not to mention the new infrastructure along with the improved air quality, due to the closing of industrial sites, made the city more appealing to visit and move to. The new developments included the most recognizable and notable sites we see today, such as the Tennessee Aquarium and Coolidge Park. Without them, the Chattanooga landscape is almost unrecognizable and bare.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Although the city effectively revived itself, there were, and continue to be, remnants of the past scattered around. Abandoned industrial buildings posed a large problem and their removal is not that easy or simple. They were left to rot and this does not correspond with Chattanooga’s new aesthetic. A solution has been to re-incorporate the buildings by creating something new from the rubble.  Below are photographs of the Ross-Meehan Foundries. Ross-Meehan Foundries produced a variety of metal products and was even a large contributor for military grade products during World War II. The company shut down in 1986 and the building was left to fall and decay. The photographs of the foundry are of before and after renovations began on it in 1997. Now, it has been transformed into the beautiful First Tennessee Pavilion which many more people are familiar with.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

From the Robert Boyer photographs collection. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Working with Robert Boyer’s photograph collection allowed me to virtually watch Chattanooga’s growth from an industrial centered city, to a large economic force in Tennessee. The photographs told stories of the new expansion and is a perfect representation of the hard work that was put in to transform the landscape. Practically walking through this city’s growth has given me new perspective and appreciation for the Chattanooga that I know today. Without this internship, I would not have gained familiarity with what it means to be an archivist or have been able to delve into the history of some of Chattanooga’s major accomplishments. I am extremely appreciative to have been able to work so closely with the city’s historical materials and grateful for the experiences it provided me.


Summer Fun with Special Collections

Summer is tantalizingly close! Get ready for fun and relaxation with some photos from the Chattanooga History Collections of people enjoying summer in the Chattanooga area in years past.

The Chattanooga History Collections consist of the former holdings of the Chattanooga History Center that are now co-owned by UTC Special Collections and the Chattanooga Public Library.  The over 30,000 items include photographs, papers and artifacts from throughout Chattanooga history from the earliest Cherokee inhabitants to Chattanooga’s transformation into Gig City in the 21st Century. For information on accessing materials in the collections and questions about the collections’ contents visit the library website’s Chattanooga History Collections page.

The Warner Park Natatorium in Chattanooga filled with bathers on June 29, 1924. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Chattanooga Lookouts baseball game held on May 1, 1936 at Engel Stadium. The Lookouts gave away a house with a car in the garage to one fan in attendance leading to an overflow crowd of 24,639 people, many of whom had to sit on the warning track in fair and foul territory. This was also the first night baseball game in Chattanooga history. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The Bragg’s Tower Ice Cream Parlor at the Come Again Shop on Missionary Ridge near Bragg’s Reservation. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Person hang gliding with a view of Lookout Mountain. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Children riding the carousel at Lake Winnepesaukah Amusement Park in Rossville, Georgia. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 


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