Summer Fun with Special Collections

Summer is here! Get ready for fun and relaxation with some photos from the Chattanooga History Collections of people enjoying summer in the Chattanooga area in years past.

The Chattanooga History Collections consist of the former holdings of the Chattanooga History Center that are now co-owned by UTC Special Collections and the Chattanooga Public Library.  The over 30,000 items include photographs, papers and artifacts from throughout Chattanooga history from the earliest Cherokee inhabitants to Chattanooga’s transformation into Gig City in the 21st Century. For information on accessing materials in the collections and questions about the collections’ contents visit the library website’s Chattanooga History Collections page.

The Warner Park Natatorium in Chattanooga filled with bathers on June 29, 1924. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Chattanooga Lookouts baseball game held on May 1, 1936 at Engel Stadium. The Lookouts gave away a house with a car in the garage to one fan in attendance leading to an overflow crowd of 24,639 people, many of whom had to sit on the warning track in fair and foul territory. This was also the first night baseball game in Chattanooga history. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The Bragg’s Tower Ice Cream Parlor at the Come Again Shop on Missionary Ridge near Bragg’s Reservation. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Person hang gliding with a view of Lookout Mountain. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Children riding the carousel at Lake Winnepesaukah Amusement Park in Rossville, Georgia. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 


Celebrate the Fourth with a Parade of Resources from Special Collections

Our nation will be turning 242 years old on Wednesday! Take a look back at parades through Chattanooga celebrating Fourths of July from years past with UTC Special Collections. For more information on the rich cultural history  resources available at UTC, please visit the Special Collections Home Page.

Daughters of Rebekah float in the 1876 Chattanooga Fourth of July Parade. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Children riding in a wagon decorated with American flags in the 1876 Chattanooga Fourth of July parade. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The 1890 Fourth of July parade down Market Street in Chattanooga. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The 1890 Fourth of July parade down Market Street near 9th Street (9th Street was renamed Martin Luther King Boulevard in 1981) in Chattanooga. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Men leading horses pulling a float in during a parade in front of 619 Market Street in Chattanooga in the early 20th Century. Street car tracks are visible next to the float. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.


Explore the Fourth of July in Union-Occupied Chattanooga

As Chattanooga prepares to celebrate our nation’s 242nd birthday Wednesday, Special Collections looks back to July 4, 1864 when Chattanooga was occupied by Federal troops after being captured the previous year. For more information on the unique resources available at UTC, please visit Special Collections.

George Young of the 20th Ohio Battery was among the soldiers stationed in Chattanooga. In a letter written to his sweetheart Lottie Lasher in Waymart, Pennsylvania on July 4th, 1864, Young discusses the patriotism that drove him to enlist in the army, opines that Union troops would never have been driven from Missionary Ridge if they had been the defenders, and complains about Chattanooga’s heat. The first page of the letter is pictured below, but all four pages and a transcription can be viewed in the CHC Online collection.

Page one of a letter written by Union soldier George Young in Chattanooga to Lottie Lasher in Waymart, Pennsylvania. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The Union occupation of Chattanooga required drastic changes to the city. Chattanooga was not large enough to accommodate all of the soldiers and during the winter of 1863 a Tent City was constructed to house the army.

The Tent City in Chattanooga during the winter of 1863 to 1864. Taken by Thomas T. Sweeney. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The Union Army constructed the first bridge across the Tennessee River at Chattanooga during the occupation. The bridge, ordered by Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs was completed in 1864. However, the bridge did not long outlast the occupation as it was washed away during the flood of 1867 and subsequently dubbed “Meigs’ Folly.”

Construction of the military bridge across the Tennessee River at Chattanooga in 1864. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

More permanent structures were also constructed during the war by both the Confederate and Union armies. This included fortifications on Missionary Ridge and Cameron Hill, as well as a military prison. The Union army also constructed less visible structures including water supply pipes to downtown buildings.

View of Market Street looking toward Cameron Hill circa 1864. The view shows Raccoon Mountain, a military prison, Fort Cameron, Cameron Hill and various other buildings constructed by the Union army during their occupation. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

Union Army Office of Post Quartermaster in Chattanooga, located on Poplar Street between 6th and 7th Streets. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

A section of a water supply main installed in Chattanooga by Union soldiers that was excavated from Market Street during the 1960s. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The occupation by both the Confederate and Union armies effected Chattanooga’s residents in a variety of ways. 15 year old Kate Foster kept a diary in 1864, and while she complained about her parents having to house Union officers and their families, her diary entries are most concerned with how the occupation impacted her social life. The entry on July 4th recounts the Independence Day celebrations at Union headquarters and a party she attended in the evening with a Union soldier.

Diary entries made by Kate Foster of Chattanooga on July 3-5, 1864. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Thomas Crutchfield of Chattanooga, who later professed that he had stayed loyal to the Union cause and aided Federal troops, nonetheless provided food and lodging to Confederate soldiers in the early years of the war. Writing after  the Union occupation had begun in December 1863, Crutchfield estimated that the war had cost him $100,000 in lost crops and lost revenue from his family’s hotel, The Crutchfield House, which he sold before hostilities started to remove his family to a more peaceful area. The Crutchfield House is pictured below in 1864 during Union occupation, flying the American flag.

The Crutchfield House in Chattanooga in 1864. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.


New Podcast Features Research Conducted in Special Collections

Project SSA logo.Researchers make use of the rich materials in Special Collections for a myriad of reasons, including a new podcast entitled Project SSA. Listen to archival research in action in an investigation into Chattanooga’s “secret, sinister activity,” and see if you can identify references to our unique cultural heritage resources.


US and UK Legal Treatises

The UTC Library now has access to “The Making of Modern Law: US and UK Legal Treatises,” a robust collection of legal primary resources dating from the 19th and early 20th centuries.

This database features 10 million pages and over 21,000 works that provide a comprehensive look at many different aspects of law. Historians and legal researchers will appreciate the ability to keyword search across the full text of all documents available as well as browse the database by treatise title and author. Researchers also have the ability to limit their searches by topics like criminal law, education, social security, and legal history for more targeted results. The advanced search feature will even pull illustrations and cartoons!

Take a look at what “The Making of Modern Law: US and UK Legal Treatises” has to offer!


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