Summer Fun with Special Collections

Summer is tantalizingly close! Get ready for fun and relaxation with some photos from the Chattanooga History Collections of people enjoying summer in the Chattanooga area in years past.

The Chattanooga History Collections consist of the former holdings of the Chattanooga History Center that are now co-owned by UTC Special Collections and the Chattanooga Public Library.  The over 30,000 items include photographs, papers and artifacts from throughout Chattanooga history from the earliest Cherokee inhabitants to Chattanooga’s transformation into Gig City in the 21st Century. For information on accessing materials in the collections and questions about the collections’ contents visit the library website’s Chattanooga History Collections page.

The Warner Park Natatorium in Chattanooga filled with bathers on June 29, 1924. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Chattanooga Lookouts baseball game held on May 1, 1936 at Engel Stadium. The Lookouts gave away a house with a car in the garage to one fan in attendance leading to an overflow crowd of 24,639 people, many of whom had to sit on the warning track in fair and foul territory. This was also the first night baseball game in Chattanooga history. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The Bragg’s Tower Ice Cream Parlor at the Come Again Shop on Missionary Ridge near Bragg’s Reservation. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Person hang gliding with a view of Lookout Mountain. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Children riding the carousel at Lake Winnepesaukah Amusement Park in Rossville, Georgia. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 


Intern Perspectives: Caroline Floyd

This blog post was authored by Caroline Floyd, an intern in the Library’s Special Collections unit from the UTC Department of History in Spring 2018.

Working for Special Collections at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga has provided me with the opportunity to work in a professional and academic environment. This was important to me, as it gave me the chance to have a feel for the professional world, while still having education at the heart of it all. As a History major, I have spent the past 4 years working with primary sources and different perspectives, and learning about the role that individuals have in shaping major events. Working with the Thomas R. Jones Sr. papers has given me the chance to unpack one individual’s perspective on a much broader and life-changing event, Word War II. As well as being able to utilize my historical background, this internship has taught me valuable lessons in time management. While I had a certain amount of hours to complete for the internship itself, I struggled with, and eventually learned to manage, getting work done in a timely manner. I’ve sharpened my skills with regard to using Photoshop and Excel, as well as learned to enter data efficiently. The archival work that I have helped to complete for Special Collections will provide information to people all over the world, including people like myself who are searching for perspectives that will help shape theirs.

Below is the first page of letter from Tommy Jones to his wife, Mary Mildred, in which he encloses German propaganda dropped on American soldiers serving in the European front during World War II.

Thomas R. Jones, Sr. correspondence with Mary Mildred Jones, 1945 March 19

First page of Thomas R. Jones, Sr. correspondence with Mary Mildred Jones, 1945 March 19. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

German propaganda enclosed with Thomas R. Jones, Sr. correspondence with Mary Mildred Jones, 1945 March 19. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

German propaganda enclosed with Thomas R. Jones, Sr. correspondence with Mary Mildred Jones, 1945 March 19. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

 

German propaganda enclosed with Thomas R. Jones, Sr. correspondence with Mary Mildred Jones, 1945 March 19. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections

German propaganda enclosed with Thomas R. Jones, Sr. correspondence with Mary Mildred Jones, 1945 March 19. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

The Thomas R. Jones, Sr. World War II Correspondence digital collection features letters written by the American Army Private First class Tommy Jones to Mary Mildred Jones, his wife and mother of his child in Cleveland, Tennessee. The letters range in date from the beginning of his basic training in 1943 to the end of the war and his return home in 1945. In this collection, a man from small town Tennessee is reluctantly drafted into the Army during World War II. In these very personal letters to his wife, he expresses constant disdain for training activities, how much he misses his family, and the war in general. The letters document fear, uncertainty, personal change, and hope. His letters provide a real life example of the experience that many Americans faced, contrary to the American political wartime propaganda belief of overall positivity and support for the war. Jones begins to find some solace in the experience due to the friendships he has formed, the opportunity he is given to travel and experience Europe, and being able to interact with family via letters. PFC Jones is injured during combat by some fragments of a explosion, and eventually receiving a Purple Heart decoration, which he had previously expressed was something he was never interested in, as he was only ever interested in the war ending and returning to his family.

 


Early Commencement Ceremonies

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga celebrates many traditions, but perhaps none as firmly rooted in our school’s history as commencement.

During the first commencement, Chattanooga University awarded eight degrees during their first graduation ceremony, including one honorary master’s degree. Early graduation festivities included a weeklong series of events culminating in commencement. The festivities often kicked off with musical events, which were followed by trips to Lookout Mountain,  baccalaureate sermons, and oratory contents, as well as dinner parties and other events to celebrate the graduates.

Chattanooga University commencement program, 1887 June 8

The program from the first Chattanooga University commencement ceremony, dated 1887 June 8. Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Bishop I. W. Joyce, the third president of the university, imparted the following words to the third graduating class of 1889 on Sunday, June 5 in his baccalaureate address entitled “The Mission of Educated Minds” held in the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

I see the scholars go forth to their life mission, perhaps with a curst of bread and a cup of water. One goes into the ranks of law, another to medicine, another to farmer, another to merchandise; but after their day of toil they are ready to hasten.

Old Stone Church, Chattanooga, Tennessee

Photograph of the Old Stone Church where many early university were held. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

While classes were conducted in Old Main, early commencement ceremonies were held in the First Methodist Episcopal Church, constructed between 1881 and 1885 at the southeast corner of Georgia Avenue and McCallie Avenue. Colloquially referred to at the Old Stone Church, the building was razed in 1977, but the steeple remains as a lasting memory of the building’s unique architecture.

Old Main

Photograph of Old Main, the building that formed the original UTC campus. Courtesy of the Chattanooga Public Library and University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Special Collections.

Good Luck!

We wish the best of luck to this year’s graduates as they take part in the commencement traditions and ceremonies that started 131 years ago at Chattanooga University.

References

Chattanooga University. “Commencement Week.” University Lookout (Chattanooga, Tennessee), June 1889, 6.

Govan, Gilbert E. (Gilbert Eaton). The University of Chattanooga: sixty years. Chattanooga: Univ. of Chattanooga, 1947.


Work in Special Collections this Summer!

This position has closed. We are no longer accepting applications.

Special Collections is currently hiring UTC students to work part time in the repository this summer.

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) Special Collections is responsible for acquiring, processing, digitizing, and preserving unique, cultural heritage materials. In particular, the materials focus on the university, Chattanooga, the state of Tennessee, and the American South. Student Assistants play critical roles in Special Collections by helping the repository create digital collections, finding aids, and exhibits of cultural heritage resources. Special Collections stresses a standards-based approach to digitization and description and uses archival and digital asset management systems commonly adopted by galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAMs) in the United States.
  • Special Collections provides in-depth training for student assistants so that they gain important transferrable skills and exposure to professional software applications that may help prepare them for graduate studies or careers in archival administration and records management.
  • Special Collections communicates with student assistants through their MocsMail email accounts and shares documents with them via Google Drive. Schedules are managed through MocsMail calendars. Students are expected to consult their calendars and email daily.
  • All student assistants are responsible for making their own parking arrangements. Further, student assistants working in Special Collections during must be willing work onsite during our regular hours of operation at least 15 hours a week during the UTC Summer Long Term (May 16, 2018 to August 7, 2018).
Position Summary
Part time student assistants working in Special Collections in Summer 2018 will be assigned to one of the following projects:
  • Review and edit accession records in the recently-acquired Chattanooga History Collections to ensure compliance with local descriptive practices and ascertain important legal title and copyright transfer to inform future processing and digitization priorities.
  • Edit images and review digital object metadata for materials in the Herman Lamb photographs collection in compliance with local digitization and descriptive practices.
Required Qualifications
  • Ability to work independently and produce high quality, thorough, and accurate work
  • Ability to follow detailed written instructions
  • Strong organizational, analytical and problem-solving skills as well as demonstrated initiative and adaptability
  • Working knowledge of office productivity suites, such as Microsoft Office and Google Drive
  • Effective written and oral communication skills
Desired Qualifications
  • Demonstrated experience working in a library or archival repository
  • Demonstrated experience using complex data entry systems
Compensation
Student assistants working in Special Collections will be compensated at a rate of $7.25 per hour. They may not work more than 29 hours a week.
Apply
To apply, please send a cover letter, resume, and application to the Director of Special Collections, Carolyn Runyon, using the UT Vault.
  • Log into UT Vault at vault.utk.edu using your alias address and UTC password. Every UTC student has an alias address. Example: abc123@mocs.utc.edu would enter her email address as ABC123@tennessee.edu.
  • Address the message to Carolyn Runyon at Carolyn-Runyon@utc.edu with the Subject: Student Assistant Application – Your Name. Compose your message and attach your cover letter, resume, and complete application.
  • Check the box “Send me verification when the message is received.”
Cover letters should provide a description of the applicant’s relevant experience and expertise and describe the applicant’s motivation for working in Special Collections. Candidates must interview with the Director of Special Collections.

Making of Modern Law: U.S. Supreme Court

The UTC Library has enhanced its legal and historical research offerings with “The Making of Modern Law: U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs.”
This database contains over 150,000 Supreme Court cases from 1832-1978, covering events from before the American Civil War up until just after the Vietnam War.
Users can keyword search across all records and briefs and can also limit their search by date, or look up cases by case docket number or U.S. Reports citation.
These primary documents will interest those researching American constitutional, political, legal, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history.

Case documents are available for many landmark Supreme Court cases, such as:

Access U.S. Supreme Court Records & Briefs


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