Women’s History Month Events

It started as “Women’s History Week” in 1982. Now expanded to Women’s History Month, it celebrates and honors the achievements and struggles of American women.

Below are listings for the virtual and in-person events taking place at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga throughout March.

Interested in learning more about local women’s history?

Women’s History Month Exhibit

When: Throughout March

Where: Lupton Hall

Admission: Free

Details:

“March Through History,” a display of posters showcasing women throughout history with information and opportunities to learn more about the individuals highlighted in the exhibit.

Presented by:

Center for Women and Gender Equity

“My Life as a Psychologist in a Women’s Prison: It’s Not All CSI and Orange Is the New Black” with guest speaker Veronica Tetterton

When: 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 3.

Where: Register to attend the Zoom session here.

Admission: Free

Details:

Veronica Tetterton is a licensed psychologist with experience in mental health, trauma and substance abuse counseling. She worked for the Federal Bureau of Prisons as trauma treatment coordinator and residential drug abuse treatment coordinator and was one of the first people to start a trauma treatment program for female offenders. She is the cofounder of Anticipate Joy, a mental health focused company providing affordable professional counseling services. The focus of her presentation will be on her experience working in a women’s prison.

Presented by:

Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the Department of Psychology, the Department of Social, Cultural and Justice Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences

Women’s History Month Trivia Zoom

When: 3 p.m. Thursday, March 4

Where: Zoom ID: 96224880617; Password: whm21

Admission: Free

Details: Follow the Center for Women and Gender Equity on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to learn more.

Presented by:

Center for Women and Gender Equity

Online Author Visit with NY Times #1 Bestselling Author Rebecca Wells

When: 4 p.m., Monday, March 8

Where: youtube.com/utclib

Admission: Free and open to the public

Details:

In honor of Women’s History Month, and in celebration of International Women’s Day, the UTC Library is thrilled to welcome #1 New York Times bestselling author Rebecca Wells for a livestream reading and conversation. We’re streaming to YouTube, so you are invited and welcome to attend this public event!
    
Rebecca’s beloved novels, Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, Little Altars Everywhere, and Ya-Yas in Bloom, as well as The Crowning Glory of Calla Lily Ponder, showcase the enduring, beautiful, funny, heartbreaking, and wondrous relationships among women. Rebecca explores the complex bond between mothers and daughters; the necessity and delight of female friendship; the mixed inheritance that (to use Rebecca’s phrase) the Cult of Southern Lady-hood conveys; and the shape-shifting power of the Divine Feminine. Rebecca’s work, translated into 23 different languages, is universal. But her soil is the soul of the American South, and nobody works it like she does.
   
Join us as Rebecca shares her own “divine secrets” of love and loss, illness and health, and ultimately, her abiding faith in the deep healing that creativity can give. This vibrant and heartfelt event will take place Monday, March 8 from 4 – 5:30 p.m. EST on youtube.com/utclibrary.

Presented by:

UTC Library

Black Women: The Proverbial Canary in the Coal Mine, a Desserts and Dialogues series

When: 1-2 p.m. Monday, March 15

Where: Zoom ID: 96391846194; Password: canary

Admission: Free

Details: Follow the Center for Women and Gender Equity on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to learn more.

Presented by: Center for Women and Gender Equity

CECS presents Women in Stem with Maggie Weber

When: 2:30 – 3:15 p.m., Monday, March 15

Where: Zoom ID: 6862822160; Password: Outreach

Admission: Free and open to all UTC students.

Details:

Maggie Weber, PhD, and the CECS Student Ambassadors will discuss women in STEM and the engineering field.

Questions are welcome!

Presented by:

This is a part of the College of Engineering and Computer Science Ambassador-Sponsored Professional Conversations Series.

“Building a Movement: Black Women Organizing in the (Global) South” with guest speaker Keisha Blain

When: 4 p.m. Monday, March 15

Where: Zoom ID: 96394815303; Password: 037413

Admission: Free and open to the public.

Details:

Highlights the political activism of Black nationalist women who organized in the U.S. South in tandem with women activists in the Global South, especially Latin America and the Caribbean. While mainstream historical narratives tend to focus on the political work of Black women during the modern Civil Rights Movement, Blain discusses the local, national and transnational efforts of women who organized Black working-poor people during the tumultuous years of the Great Depression. These women’s stories underscore how Black women have shaped national and global politics, and they reveal how those who were outside traditional halls of power still found ways to effect change in the U.S. and abroad.

About the speaker:

Keisha N. Blain is an award-winning historian of the 20th century United States with broad interests and specializations in African American History, the modern African Diaspora and Women’s and Gender Studies. She is an associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh and the president of the African American Intellectual History Society. She is currently a 2020-21 fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University. She is co-editor of multiple books and the author of the multi-prize-winning book, Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom. Her latest books include Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 and Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer’s Enduring Message to America.

Presented by:

Africana Studies, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the Department of History, the Department of English and the Department of Political Science and Public Service 

“Intersectionality in Practice” with guest speaker Feminista Jones

When: 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 16

Where: To attend this event Via Zoom, register here.

Admission: Free

Details:

Media personality, community activist, podcaster and author of three books, including the critically acclaimed Reclaiming Our Space: How Black Feminists are Changing the World from the Tweets to the Streets, will discuss the idea of intersectionality from just a theory to something in the real world—how a person’s social and political identities influence the discrimination or privilege they experience and live every day.

Presented by:

Social, Cultural and Justice Studies, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences 

Skincare 101

When: 1-2 p.m., Wednesday, March 17

Where: Register for the virtual event: thechattery.org/utcvss.

Details:

Social distancing is the perfect time to think about skincare. Learn all about what skincare products are right for your skin, what ingredients to look for and avoid, and what your morning and evening skincare routine should be.

Presented by:

Veteran Student Services, Center for Women and Gender Equity, the Chattery and Shaina Ramsey

“How to Not Always be Working” UTC Student/Faculty/Staff Women Self Care Virtual Book Event

When: 10:30 a.m. – noon, Friday, March 19

Where: Zoom. Register here. 

Details: 

“How to Not Always Be Working” a guided self-care virtual book event for UTC Student/Faculty/Staff women moderated by Savannah Welch, UTC Clinical Counseling Intern in the Center for Student Wellbeing

This part workbook, advice manual, and love letter; ventures into the space where work meets life, helping readers to define their work—what you do out of sense of purpose; your job—what you do to make money; and breaks—what you do to recharge, and to feel connected to your inner-self and the people who matter the most. The author provides insight to help you figure out how much is too much, and offers suggestions for making the best use of your time.

Essential for anyone who feels overwhelmed and anxious about our hyper-connected world—whether you’re a corporate lawyer, a student, a sales person, or a yoga instructor—How to Not Always Be Working includes practical suggestions and thoughtful musings that prompt you to honestly examine your behavior—how you burn yourself out and why you’re doing it. A creative manifesto for living better, it shows you how to carve sacred space in your life.

Read or Listen to this pocket sized self-care book and before we hold our live guided discussion! Join the Women Self Care with Purpose Facebook group and stay connected. Free self-care journals will be available for attendees to pick up after the event.

Presented by: Veteran Student Services

Women’s History Month ‘Guess Who’ Game

When: 3 p.m., Thursday, March 25

Where: Zoom ID: 98645698750; Password: whm21

Admission: Free

Details: Follow the Center for Women and Gender Equity on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to learn more.

Presented by:

Center for Women and Gender Equity

Take Five presents Marian Wright Edelman’s Lanterns: A Memoir of Mentors

When: 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 30

Where: Zoom meeting. Email verbie-prevost@utc.edu for details.

Admission: Free and open to the public

Details:

This Take Five session explores Marian Wright Edelman’s Lanterns: A Memoir of Mentors, presented by former English professor Verbie Prevost. The online presentation will be available by March 16, and the live Zoom session of the novel will take place at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, March 30. Email verbie-prevost@utc.edu if you wish to join. Direct any questions to Aaron Shaheen at Aaron-Shaheen@utc.edu.

Presented by:

Take Five is an annual series of talks, each exploring a great American novel. This series is presented by the English Department and Connor Professorship in American Literature.

Afro-Diasporic Kinships: Audre Lorde and Black-German Women with guest speaker Tiffany Florvil

When: 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 5

Where: Zoom ID: 94441736101; Password: 342445

Admission: Free and open to the public.

Details:

In a letter dated July 12, 1986 to Caribbean-American feminist and poet Audre Lorde, Afro-German author and educator Marion Kraft wrote, “Our experiences might be very different, indeed but more important for me was to recognize the commonalities, the discrimination and oppression Black women are facing all over the world, but also their strength, their creativity in various fields — and their dedication to life!” Traveling throughout Europe in the 1980s and 1990s, Lorde served as a role model and influenced numerous Black European communities.

In her talk, Tiffany Florvil contends that Lorde’s exchanges and connections with Afro- German women such as Marion Kraft, May Ayim and Katharina Oguntoye were multidirectional and offered these women an affective and intellectual community.

About the speaker:

Tiffany N. Florvil is an associate professor of 20th-century European Women’s and Gender History at the University of New Mexico. She specializes in the histories of post-1945 Europe, the African/Black diaspora and gender and sexuality. She published Mobilizing Black Germany: Afro-German Women and the Making of a Transnational Movement which offers the first full-length study of the history of the modern Black German movement. Florvil has published Rethinking Black German Studies and written chapters in Gendering Post-1945 German History and To Turn this Whole World Over. She is also an editor of the “Imagining Black Europe” book series.

Presented by:

UTC Africana Studies, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the Department of History, the Department of English and the Department of Political Science and Public Service



Media Relations Contacts: Email UTC Media Relations or call 423-425-5119.
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